Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Pure Michigan Then and Now
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Pure Michigan Then and Now

Recalling the age of tourism by rail and steamship

Erin Crowell - November 12th, 2012  


Did you know? Long before Tim Allen was promoting Michigan with his smooth, hypnotic-like voice, our state’s first Pure Michigan campaign was drawing visitors as early as the 1800s.

On Friday, Nov. 16, Michael Federspiel will discuss how local entrepreneurs teamed with railroad and steamship companies to market the Little Traverse Bay region over 100 years ago.

The luncheon lecture will take place at the North Central Michigan College library conference room, in Petoskey, at noon. Lunch will be provided for $9.

DIFFERENT TIMES…

Federspiel, who is executive director of the Little Traverse Historical Society, splits his time teaching history at North Central Michigan College and at Central Michigan University, making him a semi-nomad between his home in the Petoskey area and his home in Midland.

This is the case for many residents of Little Traverse Bay.

“This presentation is designed for people who are local residents, but also for people who occasionally call it home,” Federspiel said by phone, while on the road between his own domiciles. “I’ll be bringing historical images, places people will recognize today and places they won’t recognize because it’s changed so dramatically.”

One of the major differences between the tourism industry then and now is transportation.

“It was largely fielded by public transportation,” said Federspiel. “Little Traverse Bay had the second largest transportation system in Michigan, second to Detroit, in terms of trains and passengers. In 1906, these trains would run every 15 or 20 minutes.”

Advertising was also different then, with newspaper ads and tourist booklets that were available through the railroad.

In terms of funding, things were a bit different then, too.

“That time, it was the railroad companies, steamship companies and local entrepreneurs who were funding the whole thing. It wasn’t a government funded program like it is today.”

…BUT NOT THAT DIFFERENT

While there are differences between marketing methods and funding sources, the target market hasn’t changed much.

“They were blanketing regional cities like Chicago, Kansas City, Louisville, Indianapolis and Cleveland in order to draw people out and encourage them to escape the hot summers of the Midwest, particularly in cities where the health situation with pollution wasn’t good,” said Federspiel.

Our current Pure Michigan campaign still markets to these areas, including regions as far as Milwaukee and Ontario.

At the turn of the 19th Century, the fad was healthy living (sound familiar?).

“Petoskey had a mineral springs bath where you could come and bathe to cure breathing problems like asthma,” said Federspiel.

The area was also heavily marketed to sportsmen for fishing and hunting, and has since expanded into a four-seasons market with such activities like skiing and snowmobiling added to the list.

Just like today, the marketing target included a broad range of demographic where “folks could stay at hotels and eat oysters on the half-shell and go dancing,” said Federspiel, “while boarding houses were also made accommodating to those with little money.’ And—just like today—once people arrived in the area, there was plenty of that “rustic Up North” Michigan to experience, from the Hiawatha Festival to lumbering ground tours.

THE RESULT

Today, the Little Traverse Bay region is a hub of tourist activity, as well as the rest of the state of Michigan, thanks in large part to the marketing efforts of the businesses and transportation industry of yesteryear.

In 2009, the Pure Michigan campaign brought 680,000 summer visitors from out of state where they spent $250 million and paid $17.5 million in taxes – a large return on the $30 million that was spent to fund the campaign.

“I hope it becomes pretty evident that that marketing of the area is still fueling what we have today,” said Federspiel.

Michael Federspiel will discuss the original “Pure Michigan” campaign on Nov. 16 at the North Central Michigan College library conference room. The presentation starts at noon and will include lunch for $9. Reservations are preferred by calling 231-348-6600 or by email, cmacinnis@ncmich.edu.

 
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