Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Pure Michigan Then and Now

Recalling the age of tourism by rail and steamship

Erin Crowell - November 12th, 2012  


Did you know? Long before Tim Allen was promoting Michigan with his smooth, hypnotic-like voice, our state’s first Pure Michigan campaign was drawing visitors as early as the 1800s.

On Friday, Nov. 16, Michael Federspiel will discuss how local entrepreneurs teamed with railroad and steamship companies to market the Little Traverse Bay region over 100 years ago.

The luncheon lecture will take place at the North Central Michigan College library conference room, in Petoskey, at noon. Lunch will be provided for $9.

DIFFERENT TIMES…

Federspiel, who is executive director of the Little Traverse Historical Society, splits his time teaching history at North Central Michigan College and at Central Michigan University, making him a semi-nomad between his home in the Petoskey area and his home in Midland.

This is the case for many residents of Little Traverse Bay.

“This presentation is designed for people who are local residents, but also for people who occasionally call it home,” Federspiel said by phone, while on the road between his own domiciles. “I’ll be bringing historical images, places people will recognize today and places they won’t recognize because it’s changed so dramatically.”

One of the major differences between the tourism industry then and now is transportation.

“It was largely fielded by public transportation,” said Federspiel. “Little Traverse Bay had the second largest transportation system in Michigan, second to Detroit, in terms of trains and passengers. In 1906, these trains would run every 15 or 20 minutes.”

Advertising was also different then, with newspaper ads and tourist booklets that were available through the railroad.

In terms of funding, things were a bit different then, too.

“That time, it was the railroad companies, steamship companies and local entrepreneurs who were funding the whole thing. It wasn’t a government funded program like it is today.”

…BUT NOT THAT DIFFERENT

While there are differences between marketing methods and funding sources, the target market hasn’t changed much.

“They were blanketing regional cities like Chicago, Kansas City, Louisville, Indianapolis and Cleveland in order to draw people out and encourage them to escape the hot summers of the Midwest, particularly in cities where the health situation with pollution wasn’t good,” said Federspiel.

Our current Pure Michigan campaign still markets to these areas, including regions as far as Milwaukee and Ontario.

At the turn of the 19th Century, the fad was healthy living (sound familiar?).

“Petoskey had a mineral springs bath where you could come and bathe to cure breathing problems like asthma,” said Federspiel.

The area was also heavily marketed to sportsmen for fishing and hunting, and has since expanded into a four-seasons market with such activities like skiing and snowmobiling added to the list.

Just like today, the marketing target included a broad range of demographic where “folks could stay at hotels and eat oysters on the half-shell and go dancing,” said Federspiel, “while boarding houses were also made accommodating to those with little money.’ And—just like today—once people arrived in the area, there was plenty of that “rustic Up North” Michigan to experience, from the Hiawatha Festival to lumbering ground tours.

THE RESULT

Today, the Little Traverse Bay region is a hub of tourist activity, as well as the rest of the state of Michigan, thanks in large part to the marketing efforts of the businesses and transportation industry of yesteryear.

In 2009, the Pure Michigan campaign brought 680,000 summer visitors from out of state where they spent $250 million and paid $17.5 million in taxes – a large return on the $30 million that was spent to fund the campaign.

“I hope it becomes pretty evident that that marketing of the area is still fueling what we have today,” said Federspiel.

Michael Federspiel will discuss the original “Pure Michigan” campaign on Nov. 16 at the North Central Michigan College library conference room. The presentation starts at noon and will include lunch for $9. Reservations are preferred by calling 231-348-6600 or by email, cmacinnis@ncmich.edu.

 
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