Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Ice Boating an ancient sport in...
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Ice Boating an ancient sport in a modern world

John L. Russell - December 3rd, 2012  

The docks have been pulled from the lakes, and the boats are covered and stored for the winter.

It’s time to go sailing. Iceboating, to be more precise. Sailing on frozen surfaces is believed to have its roots in Northern Europe, where goods and people moved around the region on frozen rivers and canals, using simple sails and handmade boats.

The Dutch and others brought iceboating to the Hudson River valley and other places along the East Coast, where miles of frozen rivers made for great sailing during the winter months. Freight and people were commonly moved up and down the Hudson River in huge, slooped-rigged boats.

Ranging in length from 30 - 50 feet, the stern-steering boats are still raced today by the Northwest Ice Yacht Association, having recently celebrated its 100th anniversary.

MICHIGAN’S ROLE

The ancient sport of sailing on frozen lakes and rivers is alive and well in our state, which has a long and involved history in the sport. Innovations developed in Michigan have enhanced and improved iceboating.

During the winter of 1936-1937, in the hobby shop at the Detroit News, boat builder Archie Arroll, along with Norm Jarrait and Joe Lodge, designed an ice boat they called the Blue Streak 60.

Designed to be small enough to build in a garage, and easy enough to be built by anyone, the 12-foot hull design became known as the DN 60, for Detroit News and the 60-square-foot sail.

It is now the largest one-design boat class in the world, with over 8,000 registered boats around the world.

Founded in Michigan, and incorporated in 1962, the International Ice Yacht Racing Association has seen its membership grow to over 2,000 sailors in Europe and North America, and holds its World Championship regatta each year, alternating between Europe and North America to a site with the best sailing conditions. Regional regattas lead up to the races, which can attract up to 100 boats. European and North American championship regattas are also held yearly.

Kalamazoo, Muskegon, Bay City, Traverse City and Detroit all have active ice boating clubs, who travel and sail wherever the ice conditions allow. The Gull Lake club near Kalamazoo has been active for over 100 years.

Several Michigan sailors have won North American and World Championships.

RULES & REGS

Iceboating rules are strict for safe racing and enjoyable sailing.

Iceboaters wear helmets, carry floatation devices early and late winter, and exercise caution while sailing and racing. Safety is part of all sailing events. Ice picks and whistles are also carried by many sailors.

Most clubs have ice checkers, who travel to frozen lakes and check the ice for thickness, open water areas, cracks and heaves, and other factors. Once suitable ice is found, the word goes out on the internet and through club contacts, and sailors appear, sometimes in large numbers if snow has closed their favorite sailing sites.

Black ice, which has no snow and has frozen to a state of clear perfection, is preferred but found mostly during the early season.

An ice thickness of five inches or more is preferred for safety.

Ice with snow cover becomes sailable after a thaw, then hard re-freezing, which is found mostly in mid- to late winter.

Conditions are always checked and confirmed before wide-spread sailing on any lake, as safety is of the utmost importance, with large run-off areas made available for racing, as the iceboat has no brakes and must run off forward speed.

The Grand Traverse Ice Yacht Club in Traverse City is known throughout the state, the region, the country and the world for it’s world-class hospitality and its ability to hold major racing events on short notice. The club’s members and officers work tirelessly to maintain safe and enjoyable sailing at easily-accessible sites.

The club was founded over 20 years ago by area sailors who were interested in extending the season, and others who were into the sport and knew an organized group would be fun and informative. The club meets monthly from October to May to build, sail, and race iceboats.

The weekends are fun social gatherings, and anyone visiting a site where the boats are set up will find someone willing to show off their craft.

Meeting monthly on the first Tuesday at 7 pm at the Grand Traverse Yacht Club near Traverse City, the club offers instruction, building techniques, safety seminars, and weekend racing and cruising, and in the past has hosted regional regattas, North American championships, and recently hosted a World Championship on Torch Lake, where over a dozen countries vied for the title of North American Champion as well as World Champion.

The club has a hotline that is updated as conditions change, 231-922-3836 or can be reached by email at GTIYC.org@gmail.com or on their website at gtiyc.org.

 
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