Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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FESTIVAL OF TRAINS celebrates a decade of mini locomotives

Erin Crowell - December 24th, 2012  


Ah, yes. The steamy shrill of a train whistle. It’s not something we hear often in Traverse City these days, except when it’s time for the annual Festival of Trains. Presented by the Northern Michigan Railroad Club (NMRC) at the History Center of Traverse City, this year marks the 10th anniversary of the miniature models and is open now through New Years Day.

Long before we had a marina (and we’re talking 1950s), Traverse City had four rails bringing trains to haul away the lumber from here and surrounding areas, said TC History Center executive director, Bill Kennis.

“The Chicago fire (in 1871) sent us millions in revenue for our lumber,” Kennis said about the region’s sudden relevance in that industry. “Nearby Manistee had more millionaires per capita than any other place in the world.”

The town’s founder, Perry Hannah, has been credited for jumpstarting the railroad scene by building the first rail line. With railroad access and the need for lumber, Traverse City turned into a rail town.

FESTIVAL TRADITIONS

With the Festival, the History Center hopes to branch education and fun, said Kennis.

It seems to be working. “During this time, we will get 10,000 people through here,” he said. “On any given Saturday, we can have up to 500 people.”

The exhibit, which features the Thomas the Train theme this year, is the History Center’s biggest fundraisers and attracts not only locals but out-of-towners and ski bums, along with folks visiting family in town.

“It becomes a tradition,” said Kennis.

Some children—and adults—will come every day, he added.

It’s no wonder as it can take some time to explore what each display table has to offer, from teeny tiny people and animals to elaborate street layouts and the slew of trains that run interchangeably.

“You can’t have a train run for 14 days because it’ll burn out the motor,” explained Bill Kirschke, one of the 22 NMRC members who volunteer hours for the exhibit. “During the busy times you might see 20 different trains.”

Kirschke brought his Z-scale (smaller scale) train and track model but has a permanent 21-foot-long display at home. Each item is personally owned by an NMRC member and many, like Kirschke, are avid collectors who have purchased pieces from various trade shows, magazines and online websites.

“I paint the people,” Kirschke says about the figurines that stand barely a centimeter tall. “I get them unpainted because they’re a whole lot cheaper. They’re so small that you don’t have to really worry about how fine the paint is. You just put a glob here and a glob there. They’re not perfect but they look pretty good.”

Although model trains have been around for years and seem like an ancient hobby, the experience is what makes it timeless.

“These trains make noise, they smoke, they’re interactive,” Kennis explains as he points to a boy about the age of four who moves excitedly between stations “It’s not static. It’s not a video or a book. It’s somewhat of an art form.”

The Traverse City Festival of Trains runs now through New Year’s Day at the History Center, located at 322 Sixth St. Admission is $5 per guest (free for ages four & under). Family passes are available for $30 with unlimited visits to the festival. For more information, visit festivaloftrains.org or call 231-995-0313.

 
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