Letters 10-12-2015

Replacing Pipeline Is Safe Bet On Sept. 25, Al Monaco, president and CEO of Enbridge, addressed members of the Northern Michigan Chamber Alliance. His message was, “I want to be clear. We wouldn’t be operating this line if we didn’t think it was safe.”

We pretty much have to take him for his word...

Know The Root Of Activism Author and rabbi Harold Kushner has said, “People become activists to overcome their childhood fear of insignificance.” The need to feel important drives them. They endeavor good works not to help the poor or sick or unfortunate but to fill the void in their own empty souls. Their various “causes” are simply a means to an end as they work to assuage their own broken hearts...

Climate’s Cost One of the arguments used to delay action on climate change is that it would be too expensive. Such proponents think leaving environmental problems alone would save us money. This viewpoint ignores the cost of extreme weather events that are related to global warming...

A Special Edition Cuckoo Clock The Republican National Committee should issue a special edition cuckoo clock commemorating the great (and lesser) debates and campaign 2016...

Problems On The Left Contrary to letters in the Oct 5th edition, Julie Racine’s letter is nothing but drivel, a mindless regurgitation of left-wing stuff, nonsense, and talking points. They are a litany of all that is wrong with the left: Never address an issue honestly, avoid all facts, blame instead of solving; and when all else fails, do it all over again...

Thanks, Jack It is so very difficult for the average American to understand the complex issues our country faces in far off places around the globe. (Columnist) Jack Segal’s career and his special ability to explain these issues in plain English in many forums make him a precious asset to all of us in northern Michigan...

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FESTIVAL OF TRAINS celebrates a decade of mini locomotives

Erin Crowell - December 24th, 2012  

Ah, yes. The steamy shrill of a train whistle. It’s not something we hear often in Traverse City these days, except when it’s time for the annual Festival of Trains. Presented by the Northern Michigan Railroad Club (NMRC) at the History Center of Traverse City, this year marks the 10th anniversary of the miniature models and is open now through New Years Day.

Long before we had a marina (and we’re talking 1950s), Traverse City had four rails bringing trains to haul away the lumber from here and surrounding areas, said TC History Center executive director, Bill Kennis.

“The Chicago fire (in 1871) sent us millions in revenue for our lumber,” Kennis said about the region’s sudden relevance in that industry. “Nearby Manistee had more millionaires per capita than any other place in the world.”

The town’s founder, Perry Hannah, has been credited for jumpstarting the railroad scene by building the first rail line. With railroad access and the need for lumber, Traverse City turned into a rail town.


With the Festival, the History Center hopes to branch education and fun, said Kennis.

It seems to be working. “During this time, we will get 10,000 people through here,” he said. “On any given Saturday, we can have up to 500 people.”

The exhibit, which features the Thomas the Train theme this year, is the History Center’s biggest fundraisers and attracts not only locals but out-of-towners and ski bums, along with folks visiting family in town.

“It becomes a tradition,” said Kennis.

Some children—and adults—will come every day, he added.

It’s no wonder as it can take some time to explore what each display table has to offer, from teeny tiny people and animals to elaborate street layouts and the slew of trains that run interchangeably.

“You can’t have a train run for 14 days because it’ll burn out the motor,” explained Bill Kirschke, one of the 22 NMRC members who volunteer hours for the exhibit. “During the busy times you might see 20 different trains.”

Kirschke brought his Z-scale (smaller scale) train and track model but has a permanent 21-foot-long display at home. Each item is personally owned by an NMRC member and many, like Kirschke, are avid collectors who have purchased pieces from various trade shows, magazines and online websites.

“I paint the people,” Kirschke says about the figurines that stand barely a centimeter tall. “I get them unpainted because they’re a whole lot cheaper. They’re so small that you don’t have to really worry about how fine the paint is. You just put a glob here and a glob there. They’re not perfect but they look pretty good.”

Although model trains have been around for years and seem like an ancient hobby, the experience is what makes it timeless.

“These trains make noise, they smoke, they’re interactive,” Kennis explains as he points to a boy about the age of four who moves excitedly between stations “It’s not static. It’s not a video or a book. It’s somewhat of an art form.”

The Traverse City Festival of Trains runs now through New Year’s Day at the History Center, located at 322 Sixth St. Admission is $5 per guest (free for ages four & under). Family passes are available for $30 with unlimited visits to the festival. For more information, visit festivaloftrains.org or call 231-995-0313.

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