Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · New Directions at the Detroit...
. . . .

New Directions at the Detroit Auto Show

Jim Motavalli - January 21st, 2013  

By Jim Motavalli • Featurewell

After back-to-back trips to the Detroit Auto Show and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, I’ve put together a pretty good picture of where the auto industry is headed in 2013.

The big news at CES was cars bristling with electronics to both allow them to drive themselves and to do just about anything you could possibly want with infotainment, including access the cloud. CES isn’t an auto show, but it may as well be these days—Lexus, Ford, Audi and many more were there.

The cars unveiled in Detroit last week were also app-heavy, but there was another message as well. In the wake of so-so sales for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, the carmakers are emphasizing mainstream cars and trucks again—but with up-front green characteristics. Yes, Ford sells a lot of F-150 trucks (it’s the most popular vehicle in America), but at its press conference the company emphasized that huge numbers of people are buying them with very clean EcoBoost engines.

NEW METAL

I sat in on the introductions of both the return of the Corvette Stingray and the new Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, and both are macho as can be, with 450 and 470 horsepower, respectively. But the ‘Vette has lightweight construction and cylinder de-activation (turning eight cylinders into four). Hit the “eco” mode and you’re driving the most fuel-efficient Corvette, ever.

The SRT has an “eco” button too, which optimizes transmission shifting and also uses cylinder deactivation. Of course, there’s also a “launch” button to maximize zero-to-60 times, and my guess is that the latter will get more use from this car’s target audience.

Nissan accessed the usual thundering music in Detroit to debut its Resonance Concept, a crossover SUV intended to host a new hybrid drivetrain. But just across the platform was the new, stripped-down Nissan Leaf electric car, designed to sell for $28,800 (a $6,000 cut).

And I was pleased to see Daimler’s Forstars concept car, which introduced a new and much-needed visual overhaul for the brand, which is launching a third-generation Electric Drive version this spring. The car was shown as an electric battery car, looking something like an angry scarab, and—get this—it has a movie projector built into its hood. You just aim the little buzz-box at a wall and you might as well be in a drive-in.

The Forstars deserved a bigger introduction in Detroit, because it combines two cutting-edge elements—battery power and cool technology. If you made it autonomous, too, people could watch movies as they drive and everyone would want one.

Some other things I saw and liked included the Current Motor electric scooter, which uploads data about its performance to the cloud (via a Dell partnership), and Via Motors’ partnerships with Verizon and PG&E on plug-in hybrid fleet vehicles. Electric vehicles may not be selling in huge numbers to you and me, but they’re tailor made to save money for corporate fleet buyers.

Jim Motavalli is an automotive columnist for Featurewell.com.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close