Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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New Directions at the Detroit Auto Show

Jim Motavalli - January 21st, 2013  

By Jim Motavalli • Featurewell

After back-to-back trips to the Detroit Auto Show and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, I’ve put together a pretty good picture of where the auto industry is headed in 2013.

The big news at CES was cars bristling with electronics to both allow them to drive themselves and to do just about anything you could possibly want with infotainment, including access the cloud. CES isn’t an auto show, but it may as well be these days—Lexus, Ford, Audi and many more were there.

The cars unveiled in Detroit last week were also app-heavy, but there was another message as well. In the wake of so-so sales for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, the carmakers are emphasizing mainstream cars and trucks again—but with up-front green characteristics. Yes, Ford sells a lot of F-150 trucks (it’s the most popular vehicle in America), but at its press conference the company emphasized that huge numbers of people are buying them with very clean EcoBoost engines.


I sat in on the introductions of both the return of the Corvette Stingray and the new Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, and both are macho as can be, with 450 and 470 horsepower, respectively. But the ‘Vette has lightweight construction and cylinder de-activation (turning eight cylinders into four). Hit the “eco” mode and you’re driving the most fuel-efficient Corvette, ever.

The SRT has an “eco” button too, which optimizes transmission shifting and also uses cylinder deactivation. Of course, there’s also a “launch” button to maximize zero-to-60 times, and my guess is that the latter will get more use from this car’s target audience.

Nissan accessed the usual thundering music in Detroit to debut its Resonance Concept, a crossover SUV intended to host a new hybrid drivetrain. But just across the platform was the new, stripped-down Nissan Leaf electric car, designed to sell for $28,800 (a $6,000 cut).

And I was pleased to see Daimler’s Forstars concept car, which introduced a new and much-needed visual overhaul for the brand, which is launching a third-generation Electric Drive version this spring. The car was shown as an electric battery car, looking something like an angry scarab, and—get this—it has a movie projector built into its hood. You just aim the little buzz-box at a wall and you might as well be in a drive-in.

The Forstars deserved a bigger introduction in Detroit, because it combines two cutting-edge elements—battery power and cool technology. If you made it autonomous, too, people could watch movies as they drive and everyone would want one.

Some other things I saw and liked included the Current Motor electric scooter, which uploads data about its performance to the cloud (via a Dell partnership), and Via Motors’ partnerships with Verizon and PG&E on plug-in hybrid fleet vehicles. Electric vehicles may not be selling in huge numbers to you and me, but they’re tailor made to save money for corporate fleet buyers.

Jim Motavalli is an automotive columnist for Featurewell.com.

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