Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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New Directions at the Detroit Auto Show

Jim Motavalli - January 21st, 2013  

By Jim Motavalli • Featurewell

After back-to-back trips to the Detroit Auto Show and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, I’ve put together a pretty good picture of where the auto industry is headed in 2013.

The big news at CES was cars bristling with electronics to both allow them to drive themselves and to do just about anything you could possibly want with infotainment, including access the cloud. CES isn’t an auto show, but it may as well be these days—Lexus, Ford, Audi and many more were there.

The cars unveiled in Detroit last week were also app-heavy, but there was another message as well. In the wake of so-so sales for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, the carmakers are emphasizing mainstream cars and trucks again—but with up-front green characteristics. Yes, Ford sells a lot of F-150 trucks (it’s the most popular vehicle in America), but at its press conference the company emphasized that huge numbers of people are buying them with very clean EcoBoost engines.

NEW METAL

I sat in on the introductions of both the return of the Corvette Stingray and the new Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, and both are macho as can be, with 450 and 470 horsepower, respectively. But the ‘Vette has lightweight construction and cylinder de-activation (turning eight cylinders into four). Hit the “eco” mode and you’re driving the most fuel-efficient Corvette, ever.

The SRT has an “eco” button too, which optimizes transmission shifting and also uses cylinder deactivation. Of course, there’s also a “launch” button to maximize zero-to-60 times, and my guess is that the latter will get more use from this car’s target audience.

Nissan accessed the usual thundering music in Detroit to debut its Resonance Concept, a crossover SUV intended to host a new hybrid drivetrain. But just across the platform was the new, stripped-down Nissan Leaf electric car, designed to sell for $28,800 (a $6,000 cut).

And I was pleased to see Daimler’s Forstars concept car, which introduced a new and much-needed visual overhaul for the brand, which is launching a third-generation Electric Drive version this spring. The car was shown as an electric battery car, looking something like an angry scarab, and—get this—it has a movie projector built into its hood. You just aim the little buzz-box at a wall and you might as well be in a drive-in.

The Forstars deserved a bigger introduction in Detroit, because it combines two cutting-edge elements—battery power and cool technology. If you made it autonomous, too, people could watch movies as they drive and everyone would want one.

Some other things I saw and liked included the Current Motor electric scooter, which uploads data about its performance to the cloud (via a Dell partnership), and Via Motors’ partnerships with Verizon and PG&E on plug-in hybrid fleet vehicles. Electric vehicles may not be selling in huge numbers to you and me, but they’re tailor made to save money for corporate fleet buyers.

Jim Motavalli is an automotive columnist for Featurewell.com.

 
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