Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Comedian Roundtable

A discussion with Winter Comedy Arts Festival’s Dick Gregory, Robert Wuhl and Festival Co-Founder Jeff Garlin

Rick Coates - February 11th, 2013  

We caught up with a few of the headliners of this week’s Traverse City Winter Comedy Arts Festival and got their thoughts on comedy, coming to Traverse City and some of their future projects.


Activist and comedian Dick Gregory has been performing stand up comedy since the late ’50s. He entered the national comedy scene in 1961 when Chicago’s Playboy Club, as a direct request from publisher Hugh Hefner, booked him as a replacement for a white comedian. Now 80, the African American comedian and civil rights activist whose social satire changed the way white Americans perceived African American comedians is as feisty as ever. While in the ’70s, Gregory abandoned full-time comedy to focus on his political interests, which widened from race relations to include such issues as violence, world hunger, capital punishment, drug abuse and poor health care. He has now returned to the stage making 100 plus appearances a year. He will be presented with the TC Winter Comedy Arts Legends Award on Saturday at 6 pm prior to his performance at the City Opera House.

Northern Express: Mr. Gregory you have been an outspoken critic of the injustices in our society for 60 years especially in the area of race. You have used your stand up career to at times make light of these, do you have any sense that race relations have improved at all in our country?

Dick Gregory: Yes and no, the physical has improved, but not the mental. What I mean by that is after listening to white folks for years, I assumed that all black folks looked alike. Well after President Obama was elected, I haven’t had one white person come up to me and say, “Excuse me, Mr. President.” So I guess we don’t all look alike. But sure, it has improved, but that is like saying we have cured some of the cancer in your body but there is some still there that you can live with. Well, you still have cancer in your body. The same can be said when it comes to race relations. It is a mental thing now, it is in the mind. That is where racism exists, and now we are trying to rewrite history like some things didn’t even exist.

NE: You mean like with the N-word being removed from literature and historical based films?

DG: Exactly what the hell is the N-word? I know you are trying to be respectful but if you ask a 12 year old kid, “Hey, some one called the president the N-word, they would say, “the N-word. That’s the 14th letter in the alphabet.”

Look, I didn’t invent the word nigger, it is a part of our history and to suggest that we not use the word in the context it was used in recent films like Django Unchained and Lincoln would be to create a lie. I know when I wrote my bestselling autobiography back in the early ’60s and titled it Nigger, bookstores had real issues. I remember my mother being upset with me for the title. I just told her, “don’t worry, anytime you hear a white person say Nigger they are just promoting my book.” I am just saying we can’t pretend these things never existed or don’t exist today.

NE: When you perform in Traverse City will your comedy routine focus on the societal ills of today?

DG: Sure, there will be a focus on what is going on today. It is actually easier for me to do my type of comedy today because when I started, there was just three TV networks and a handful of radio stations. Now there are 40,000 internet radio stations, cable TV and more. So there is no such thing as an uninformed person. There might be wrongly informed people but for the most part, with all that information people are probably over-informed.

I will address the thugs in the media and all the lies they are creating. Thank God we have people like Michael Moore who are willing to speak and write the truth. Michael Moore changed the way people looked at the news. He changed the belief system. He proved that you don’t need to put on a $4,000 Neiman Marcus suit and wear a $400 pair of shoes to get people to believe you. What Michael Moore showed us is money is not power, education is not power. Information is power and if you are giving people bad information you eventually find you don’t have power.

NE: So you feel that the media and the government are lying to us?

DG: Look I am 80 years old. I remember the time I use to lie and rewrite the truth to get a girlfriend. So If I would lie to get some booty what do you think these thugs will do to control the whole world?

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