Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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Splash Zone

Winter paddling has both risks and rewards

Mike Terrell - February 25th, 2013  
Northern Michigan, despite recent warmer winters, isn’t going to be thought of as a tropical zone anytime soon, but some who love to paddle don’t necessarily put their passion on hold until spring.

Those who like winter paddling seek the solitude and quiet beauty of area rivers adorned with a mantle of snow. They find the rewards are worth the risk and cold.

Sara Cockrell paddles area rivers through all four seasons, but she is a lot more cautious during the cold weather months.

“I love to paddle all year long, but I do take a lot more care during the winter months, especially not to spill, which fortunately I never have” she says with a laugh.

“I wear a layer of poly-pro, wool socks, downhill ski pants and a cross-country ski jacket topped off with rain gear. On my hands I wear Gore-Tex mittens, not gloves, a cross-country ski cap on my head and woollined Sorrels on my feet. And, I always have my cockpit spray skirt on.

“In my dry bag I pack even heavier layers than I wear, and, in addition, a fulllength down coat, full wetsuit, hand and foot warmers, and a thermos of hot water. You can never be too careful,” she cautions. “In my van I have another complete change of clothes, which I change into normally within 10 minutes after arriving at the take-out; once boats are loaded and gear stowed.”

IN & OUT

Cockrell adds a few more caveats for would-be winter paddlers.

“You need to be able to take care of the shoreline if it’s needed, and it probably will be. Steps may need to be shoveled at both the put-in and take-out. In addition, you need to think about access roads into and out of the river. Some may not be plowed or, at least, less frequently.

“Trees can come down year-round, so you need to be prepared for a possible portage around them, and logs and banks may be covered with ice. Just take care and be very careful,” she cautions.

Despite the cautions, Cockrell notes there are rewards to paddling in the winter.

“It’s a beautiful time year to on the water. Trees bowed down in winter finery remind me of flocked Christmas trees. I once saw six eagles at one time in a barren tree along the banks of the Manistee River. That’s never happened any other time of year.”

She likes larger, slower rivers for winter paddling, and advises novice paddlers to stick to summertime outings until they gain more experience.

“With the risk of hypothermia, which is real for even more experienced paddlers, I wouldn’t recommend winter paddling for novices. I would recommend that even experienced paddlers stick to the slower, wider rivers, like the Manistee, AuSable, Lower Platte or Boardman below the put-in at the old Brown Bridge Dam just taken out. There are fewer obstacles and less chance of an obstruction blocking the entire river,” the avid outdoor adventurer emphasized.

HYPOTHERMIA RISK

John Lewis, former owner of Backcountry Outfitters and former resident of Traverse City, used to enjoy winter paddling on the bay and led outings, which I joined a few times. I remember him saying that he had his cockpit spray skirt freeze from waves breaking over it. It’s not for the faint of heart, but it can be beautiful on a calm, sunny day.

You dress in layers to create dead-air space for warmth and to trap the warmth. The spray skirt helps to trap warmth for the lower body. I even wear Gore-Tex socks. Try not to get wet as you get into your kayak if you can help it.

The two terms you need to be cognizant of when heading out on the water during winter, bay or rivers, are “cold shock” and “hypothermia,” which has already been mentioned. Both can happen if you were suddenly dumped into cold water and both can be fatal.

Avoid heading out onto rivers after a storm like we had last March; wet, heavy snow that brings trees down creating impassable areas on the river. Wait until spring when the river can be cleared of debris if that occurs.

Following the advice and warnings of veteran paddlers will go a long way in protecting you during a beautiful, quiet time of year on the river. An added bonus is that you won’t have to put up with the hordes of inexperienced paddlers you find on summer outings.

 
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