Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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A Cornish Tradition in Cadillac

Mr. Foisie’s Pasties

Kristi Kates - May 13th, 2013  


So. You’re retired, you love Northern Michigan in the summertime, and you still “have enough energy to do something”… but what exactly do you do? Well, if you’re Nancy Vollmar and her husband, Jerry, you take over a restaurant, of course.

They may have had zero restaurant experience prior to their current venture, but what the Vollmars lack in culinary knowledge, they make up for with enthusiasm, attention to detail, and pride in product, that product being the longpopular Mr. Foisie’s Pasties, a Cornish tradition turned Cadillac restaurant institution.

BRING SOME BACK!

Mr. Foisie’s Pasties was founded in 1987 by Ron Foisie, a teacher at Cadillac High School with roots in the Upper Peninsula. Whenever Foisie would go back to the U.P. to visit family, his Cadillac friends would say, “bring us back some pasties!” and with the help of an old Foisie family recipe, Mr. Foisie’s Pasties was born.

The labor-intensive restaurant (all the pasties are made fresh from scratch) eventually ran its course for Foisie, and he sold his pasty business to locals Al and Gail Nelson, who ran it for 10 years. When it came time to pass the pasty torch yet again, Nancy Vollmar, a guidance counselor who had worked with Foisie at Cadillac High, was there to reach out.

“My husband and I saw the for-sale sign, and we did some investigating,” Vollmar explains. “Once we realized we could be gone in the winter and still run a solid business, we just thought it would be fun.”

The Vollmars purchased Mr. Foisie’s Pasties six years ago in August, recipes included, and threw themselves in to the new challenge.

CARRY YOUR LUNCH

On the surface, a pasty restaurant might seem like a fairly tame thing to take on to the non-restauranteur. But pasties actually have a long, colorful, and quite particular history.

The pasty’s strongest association is with Cornwall, England, although its name is a word borrowed from Medieval French that indicates a pie filled with meat and vegetables and baked without a dish. Pasties have pretty much stayed the same throughout the years - picture a halfcircle shaped turnover with meat and veggies instead of fruit.

Perhaps those most familiar with pasties were Cornish miners, who carried the pasty into the mines in their pockets as a complete meal; it could stay warm for several hours underground, and if it got cold could be warmed on a spade over a candle.

“One of the other neat historical things is that each wife of a miner had their own ‘twirl,’” Vollmar explains, “a part of the dough that was twisted or wrapped in a unique fashion on the end.

This was so the miners could tell whose pasty belonged to whom, even in the darkened mines.”

The U.P.’s pasties, which inspired the original Mr. Foisie’s, are actually something of a tourist attraction, having been brought to the region by both Cornish miners and Finnish immigrants, who adopted the pasty for use in the U.P.’s copper mines. Roadside pasty stands can still be found in the U.P. today.

Anyone who knows of all of this history will of course expect their pasties to be “made right” in the classic Cornish fashion, and that’s exactly what you’ll find at Mr. Foisie’s.

“We stick to the traditional recipes,” Vollmar explains, “beef, chicken, and vegetable. All of our pasties have rutabaga (a kind of turnip), which is a traditional pasty ingredient, although it’s not in use for much else today. There are other pasty shops that do different things with pasties, but we’re not interested in doing that - our primary focus is making our fresh, in a very clean and friendly environment.”

JUST TRY IT

Mr. Foisie’s makes their pasties three times a week, a process that keeps their whole staff busy.

“We start early on a pasty-making day,” Vollmar says. “And on the days we’re not actually making pasties, we’re prepping the ingredients, dicing potatoes, making the dough, chopping the vegetables.”

Some people like their pasties with ketchup, some with gravy, and some just like them plain, Vollmar explains. But to her and her husband, the most important thing is to start with a quality pasty, with everything as fresh as possible.

“Everything is prepared just a couple of days in advance, at the very most,” she says. “We do have frozen pasties available, but we freeze those with our own rapid-freeze process right here. Many people will have a meal in our restaurant, and will then take a bunch of frozen pasties home with them. They’re very easy to heat up later, and make a hearty meal.”

Plenty of diners choose to stay right in Mr.

Foisie’s small but welcoming café, festooned with a Union Jack, photos of miners, and other English memorabilia. The kitchen is also open to the dining area, so that visitors can view pasties and the other house specialties - desserts (fruit pies and standout apple dumplings) - being made. But dine in or carry out, the pasties are still the number one thing.

So why are pasties so popular 700 years later, and “out of their element” here in Lower Northern Michigan? “It’s just a different kind of food,” Vollmar smiles. “It’s not a fast food, but it’s quick - we try to have them warm and ready starting at 11 a.m. each day so you can walk in and get them fresh. They’re likely probably better for you than most meals you could get at a drive-thru place. And the rutabaga gives them a unique flavor that you don’t get elsewhere.”

And for $5.19 - the price for all pasties across the board at Mr. Foisie’s - who could argue with that?

“We try to keep it as simple as possible,” Vollmar says. “Try it, and you’ll like it.”

Mr. Foisie’s Pasties is located in the Cadillac Resort District at 154 Leisure Street, telephone 231-779-9042. They may also be found on Facebook.

 
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