Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Flying high with ‘Birds of...
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Flying high with ‘Birds of Paradise’

- June 10th, 2013  

The rain forests of New Guinea and their feathered occupants are revealed this week with “Birds of Paradise: Amazing Avian Evolution,” a National Geographic Traveling Exhibition coming to the Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College in TC.

The exhibition reveals all 39 species of these elusive birds for the first time. Highlighting the photography of Tim Laman and the research of ornithologist Edwin Scholes, the exhibition features the extravagant plumage, crazy courtship dances and bizarre behaviors of the extraordinary Birds of Paradise.

The exhibition will run from June 16 through September 22.

Visitors will meet Laman and Scholes through videos as they enter the exhibit, where they will also be greeted with natural soundscapes, traditional wood carvings and a montage of all 39 birds-of-paradise species.

In addition, visitors can examine the bizarre courtship dances that the males perform to attract the females. Interactive games such as “Dance, Dance Evolution” let people dance along with the birds to learn their signature moves.

The first-ever video of the female’s pointof-view of the dances is shown, captured through an innovative use of equipment created by Laman and Scholes. Visitors can also manipulate artificial tree branches to trigger video footage of different birds displayed on their perches, with commentary from Scholes.

The exhibition is sponsored in part by Northern Express Weekly. Admission to the Dennos will be $10 for adults and $5 for children and museum members.

Opening Reception:

Dennos Museum Center members and the community are invited to a ticketed preview opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday June 15 at 7 p.m. The reception will feature champagne from L Mawby Vineyards and hors d’oeuvres followed by a program in Milliken Auditorium at 8 p.m. presented by Kathryn Keane, VP of Exhibitions at National Geographic Museum and Edwin Scholes, ornithologist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Tickets are $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members. They can be purchased online at www.dennosmuseum. org/birds or by calling 231-995-1573.

 
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