Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Flying high with ‘Birds of...
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Flying high with ‘Birds of Paradise’

- June 10th, 2013  

The rain forests of New Guinea and their feathered occupants are revealed this week with “Birds of Paradise: Amazing Avian Evolution,” a National Geographic Traveling Exhibition coming to the Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College in TC.

The exhibition reveals all 39 species of these elusive birds for the first time. Highlighting the photography of Tim Laman and the research of ornithologist Edwin Scholes, the exhibition features the extravagant plumage, crazy courtship dances and bizarre behaviors of the extraordinary Birds of Paradise.

The exhibition will run from June 16 through September 22.

Visitors will meet Laman and Scholes through videos as they enter the exhibit, where they will also be greeted with natural soundscapes, traditional wood carvings and a montage of all 39 birds-of-paradise species.

In addition, visitors can examine the bizarre courtship dances that the males perform to attract the females. Interactive games such as “Dance, Dance Evolution” let people dance along with the birds to learn their signature moves.

The first-ever video of the female’s pointof-view of the dances is shown, captured through an innovative use of equipment created by Laman and Scholes. Visitors can also manipulate artificial tree branches to trigger video footage of different birds displayed on their perches, with commentary from Scholes.

The exhibition is sponsored in part by Northern Express Weekly. Admission to the Dennos will be $10 for adults and $5 for children and museum members.

Opening Reception:

Dennos Museum Center members and the community are invited to a ticketed preview opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday June 15 at 7 p.m. The reception will feature champagne from L Mawby Vineyards and hors d’oeuvres followed by a program in Milliken Auditorium at 8 p.m. presented by Kathryn Keane, VP of Exhibitions at National Geographic Museum and Edwin Scholes, ornithologist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Tickets are $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members. They can be purchased online at www.dennosmuseum. org/birds or by calling 231-995-1573.

 
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