Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Intentional Act or Drunken...
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Intentional Act or Drunken Negligence?

Mystery still shrouds hit and run death of Kellyann Boyce Hurlbert

Patrick Sullivan - July 22nd, 2013  

Police reached over 400 tips in the case of the July 5 hit and run death of Kellyann (Boyce) Hurlbert, but all of that information from the public so far hasn’t helped investigators get any closer to solving the case.

“We’re still basically at the same place we were on the fifth,” Capt. Mike Ayling, who is heading up the investigation, said last Wednesday.

The lack of progress is in stark contrast to the amount of effort investigators have put into the case. Investigators have followed up on every tip.

The FBI and the Michigan State Police recently joined the investigation. The state police can help design a crash reconstruction model that could be used at a trial, if the case reaches that point.

SIGNS OF INTENT

There are reasons to believe the hit and run was an intentional act.

First, there are the other similar crashes, one on June 28, 2012, when a pregnant 31-year-old was run down, breaking her leg, and another on July 5, 2010, when a 39-yearold woman was struck.

All three cases happened late at night, at roughly the same time of year, and each case involved a dark-colored truck. Each one involved a woman alone on her bicycle late at night. Each woman was headed east.

Another indicator in Hurlbert’s case that she was struck intentionally was that there was a parked car not far in front of the location of the initial impact, Ayling said.

That car would have been difficult for someone who was drunk to maneuver around, he said, yet the person who struck Hurlbert was able to avoid the car.

EVIDENCE OF A DRUNK DRIVER

On the other hand, this hit and run has characteristics of a drunk driver crash.

“The evidence at the scene suggests a drunk driver to me, but that doesn’t change how we’re investigating it,” Ayling said. “We’re looking at all possibilities.”

At the scene, the skid marks on the road show the driver overcorrected as they went around the turn, a signature of a drunk driver, he said.

Also, the time of night, close to closing time at bars, points toward a drunk driver, Ayling said.

Ultimately, Ayling said it can’t be determined for certain whether or not this was intentional.

“I don’t know. I wish I did,” he said.

NO VEHICLE DAMAGE

The bulk of the tips that have come in have been about vehicles with front-end damage, Ayling said.

Police now believe it is likely the crash was initially low-impact and there was no damage to the suspect’s vehicle.

“We’re not convinced that there was any damage to the vehicle,” he said. “We don’t know if there’s damage or not, but we feel there probably isn’t.”

There was no evidence left behind at the scene that suggested damage. No bits of car parts or anything like that.

Police are looking for a medium sized or smaller dark pickup or possibly an SUV. They haven’t ruled out a silver vehicle, because silver can look black in the dark, but a tip about about a silver vehicle seen near the crash is no longer considered credible, he said.

CLEANING THE STREET

Ayling said the city planned to resurface part of Washington and Railroad streets to clean up the terrifying skid marks left behind by the hit and run.

He said the city had received complaints about the disturbing marks on the road.

Workers tried to clean them off with street sweepers, which went over them several times, but that didn’t work.

Anyone with any information about the crash can still call investigators.

Detectives assigned to the case can be reached at (231) 995-5152 or anonymous tips can be called in at (231) 947-8477.

 
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