Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Going Backpacking?
. . . .

Going Backpacking?

Jim DuFresne has some ideas on where you wanna’ go

Robert Downes - August 5th, 2013  


Few backpackers know the trails of Northern Michigan as well as Jim DuFresne, who literally wrote the book on “Backpacking in Northern Michigan.”

“I have been hiking in Michigan since my Boy Scout days as an 11-year-old,” DuFresne says. “There are many trails I haven’t done, but I have done a lot, including every trail on Isle Royale, the Porcupine Mountains, Pictured Rocks and Sleeping Bear Dunes, to name a few of the larger hiking and backpacking areas of Michigan. Although I have covered other things in my writing career - sports, travel, fly fishing, hunting to name a few - really, trails has always been my main focus.”

DuFresne spends his winters in Clarkston and his summers in Elk Rapids, but he’s also created a cottage industry writing about backpacking the trails of Northern Michigan -- and most recently, offering high-quality maps and online trail guides.

His website, www.MichiganTrailMaps.com offers information on 170 trails, including detailed maps that can be downloaded and printed along with directions to trailheads.

HIKING EVERY TRAIL

DeFresne’s publishing company, Michigan TrailMaps, has also created a detailed map series, “Classic Trails of Michigan,” which is tailored to the needs of backpackers and hikers. Printed on durable cardboard stock, maps include such popular destinations as the North and South Manitou Islands and the Jordan River Pathway. Currently his company is working on a map of the Pictured Rocks Lakeshore Trail.

“For the maps of the Manitous, we spent three weeks hiking every trail,” he says. “We work with a GPS unit, take field notes, and layer the information we collect on topographic maps.

“What people who are out hiking want is a map with really valuable information, such as the distances between junctions,” he adds.

DuFresne has a staff of five to six employees who are “very avid trail users.” He’s also benefited from the support of the rangers at the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore, where his books and maps are sold in the park headquarters store. For the future, he and his staff have identified 20 to 30 additional trails for mapping.

ONLINE SALES

While his maps and books are sold at the park store, the Manitou Island Ferry shop in Leland, Horizon Books and Backcountry North in TC, DuFresne relies on his website to generate a wider net of online sales.

“We launched our website in 2010 and had 14,000 visitors last August,” he says. “We’re shooting for 20,000 visitors this August to sell our maps online.”

Of course, one could just download a map from his site, but many visitors opt for the more detailed, color maps on heavy stock which, to a backcountry hiker, well worth $4.95 for the wealth of information they provide.

TRAMPING IN NEW ZEALAND

DuFresne earned his degree in journalism from Michigan State University in the ‘70s and found work as a sportswriter in Juneau, Alaska. In the early ‘80s, he spent a winter hiking Down Under, writing his first book, “Tramping in New Zealand” for Lonely Planet Publications. After six editions and 25 years, it’s still the bestselling book on backpacking New Zealand.

Overall, he spent 32 years writing for Lonely Planet, including guides to Alaska and the Great Lakes. He also spent time writing about the outdoors for Booth Newspapers in Michigan before the industry tanked. “We had these great outdoor sections and then nothing,” he recalls. “But people still want trail information in Michigan.”

Thus, his backwoods publishing empire that has included books such as “Isle Royale Naitonal Park: Foot Trails and Water Routes,” “50 Hikes in Michigan,” Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park,” “The Complete Guide to Michigan Sand Dunes” and the aforementioned “Backpacking in Michigan,” which includes information and maps on 50 trails.

Check out a wealth of backpacking trail options at www.MichiganTrailMaps.com .

SEIZE THE DAY

When it comes to backpacking in Northern Michigan, nothing tops the months of August through October.

Reason? By then the blizzard of biting flies and mosquitoes that haunt the woods all through late May, June and July has died down, allowing you to enjoy the region’s trails without swatting and cursing like an animated windmill.

Nights are cooler -- perfect for snuggling around a campfire, but also a good reason to pack along a heavier sleeping bag.

For tips on what gear to pack, dealing with bears and trail options, check out Jim DuFresne’s book, “Backpacking in Michigan,” available in local bookstores.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close