Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Books · Thrillers Times Three
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Thrillers Times Three

Nancy Sundstrom - December 12th, 2002
Arthur Raven, Alex Cross, and Jack Forman are three tough, smart, yet sensitive guys (think a special forces operative meets Tom Hanks) who just can’t seem to stay out of harm’s way. As a result, the predicaments in which they find themselves in make for some page-turning reading and razor-sharp suspense writing.
The trio are the lead characters and heroes in the latest works from three of the toughest, smartest, and yet sensitive thriller masters around. Respectively, they are the focus of “Reversible Errors“ by Scott Turow, “Four Blind Mice“ by James Patterson, and “Prey: A Novel“ by Michael Crichton. While each has their flaws, they represent the potential of which their creators are capable of delivering, along with being highly enjoyable, worth recommending, and at present, nesting comfortably on the top of the bestseller lists.

Reversible Errors by Scott Turow
Some regard Turow, a leading lawyer by trade in his native Chicago, as the most accomplished of that elite group of writers who concoct plots involving the law, besting even John Grisham. His trademarks are layered plots with morally and ethically complicated situations and players, and he strides that turf as well as anyone.
Here, he tells the tale of Raven, a corporate lawyer who is assigned to handle the last-minute appeal of Rommy Gandolf, a death row inmate for whom the clock is ticking, years after having been - perhaps mistakenly - convicted for a brutal triple murder. Raven already has plenty on his personal plate, including caring for a schizophrenic sister and dealing with middle age feet of clay, but the challenges of the case force him to deal with greater issues, specifically the death penalty controversy.
The action heats up when another inmate, who is dying of cancer, confesses to the crime for which Gandolf is about to be executed. In ferreting out the truth about his client and what really happened, Raven encounters a series of roadblocks, especially from the judge who heard the case the first time and is back for the second round. As he becomes more determined to save Gandolf, Raven dredges up ghosts from the past, and finds he might have more in common than he thinks with those who seem to have a vested interest in seeing the convict put to death.
Turow balances the past and present storylines with ease, just as he does with exploring the legal, moral, and philosophical issues connected with the death penalty. This is a serious and compelling book with moments of true excitement, and a must for those who seek out criminal justice thrillers.

Four Blind Mice by James Patterson
Washington cop and criminal behavior expert Alex Cross has become a big time franchise for both Patterson, in books like “Kiss the Girls,“ “Along Came a Spider,“ and “Violets are Blue,“ as well as for actor Morgan Freeman, who has done a fine job of portraying him on the big screen.
Fans know that Cross’s frequent partner is John Sampson, and in this outing, a friend of Sampson’s, a U.S. Army Sergeant named Ellis Cooper, has been indicted by a military court for the murders of three women. As in Turow’s book, there is growing evidence that the man convicted of the crime did not commit it, but in this case, Cross learns that Cooper is another in a long line of military men from all over the United States who have been accused, convicted, and in some cases executed for similar crimes. There are tips from an anonymous e-mail source that may mean more trouble than help, but breaking through the walls of secrecy that come with the military becomes of more concern. In true Patterson fashion, the action peaks in a series of extremely short chapters, defying the reader to put the book down for any reason.
By the end, with Cross seemingly facing his final moments of life, the tension is almost more than one can bear, and the denouement provides a near-gushing sense of relief. “King Lear,“ this ain’t, but the fast pace, imaginative predicaments, and cliffhanger action are dished out with such gusto that this is a hard one to resist.

Prey: A Novel by Michael Crichton
Everything Crichton seems to craft turns to gold, whether its previous novels like “The Andromeda Strain,“ “Disclosure,“ or “Jurassic Park,“ or the TV series “ER.“ He has earned each of his successes, even though he can pre-sell millions of copies without even putting a word on the page.
His forte has been stories of science and technology run amok, and in “Prey,“ he delves into a horrific situation that could be pulled from the day’s headlines. Nanotechnology is the brave new world here, which Crichton describes as “the quest to build manmade machinery of extremely small size, on the order of...a hundred billionths of a meter.“ In other words, the monsters he’s conjuring up here are smaller than those in, say, “Jurassic Park,“ but have the potential to wreak even more havoc.
In this case, high-tech whistle blower Jack Forman is getting comfortable being a stay-at-home dad since being fired from his job as a computer programmer in Silicon Valley. Domestic bliss doesn’t last long, though, as Jack suspects his dynamo wife, Julia, of having an affair with a co-worker at her technology firm Xymos, their infant daughter develops a mysterious rash, Julia is hurt in a suspicious car accident, and Jack is called in to Xymos to deal with an accident at a remote laboratory in the Nevada desert.
And that’s just the start of the book. Suffice it to say, that every burner on this stove is cranking and every pot is on full boil, as Crichton layers on the plot twists that build to a rather shocking and somewhat depressing finale. Much like George Orwell’s “1984,“ “Prey“ has been written as a warning about the dangers of a world where science, technology, ambition, and a quest for power overtake common sense and human dignity, and Crichton makes a very strong case for taking what he writes seriously.

 
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