Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Goodbye, Tattoo
. . . .

Goodbye, Tattoo

Improved lasers zap tats that have outlived their welcome

Patrick Sullivan - December 9th, 2013  


Turns out that Balinese dancing girl tattooed across your chest might not have to be forever, after all.

Advances in laser technology have made tattoo removal faster, less painful and more effective. And the treatment is now available in Northern Michigan.

Cosmetic Skin & Laser Center, which has offices in Traverse City, Petoskey and Gaylord, recently started offering tattoo removal because of advances in the technology, said Kelly Bolton, office manager.

“I have been pushing for tattoo removal for quite a while. It’s the one phone call that we got and we didn’t offer the service,” Bolton said.

Now that they do offer the service, it appears there’s lots of demand. And more importantly, Bolton believes the procedure looks promising.

“We’re seeing results right after the first couple of treatments,” she said.

A TYPICAL CLIENT

There is a particular type of person who most often inquires about tattoo removal -- it’s someone whose 30- or 40- or 50-year-old self doesn’t agree with the aesthetic tastes or the judgment of their 20-year-old self.

Bolton falls in that category. While on spring break with friends back in college she got a tattoo of a flower on her hip. She recently decided that the tat would have to go.

“A lot of times, people were young and made a decision that they didn’t realize they wouldn’t appreciate as much later on as they did at the time they were getting it,” Bolton said.

She said it’s common for people who become professionals to want to get rid of tattoos, especially if the tattoos are somewhere that is visible while they are at work.

“We had one gentleman who got one on college spring break and now he is a professional,” she said. “It’s on his arm so he feels like he has to hide it.”

Others interested in removal want to change or refresh a tattoo they already have. In order to do so, in some cases it’s easier to wipe part of it away so there is a clean slate for a tattoo artist to work.

DON’T THINK, ‘WHATEVER’

Just because tattoos can be removed more effectively and with less pain than was previously the case, that doesn’t mean a decision to get a tattoo should be approached lightly, however.

“I would never, ever, ever go into getting a tattoo thinking, ‘Whatever, if I don’t like it, I’ll just get rid of it in five years,’” said Lee Middleton, R.N. B.S.N., a tattoo removal specialist at Cosmetic Skin & Laser Center.

In addition to the cost of getting a tattoo removed, there is the pain or discomfort, which, as with getting a tattoo, varies depending on where on the body the tattoo is located.

Middleton said lidocaine, an anesthetic applied as a topical cream, is used at her clinic to ease the pain. Nonetheless, it’s a medical procedure, and there are risks, such as infection.

Middleton said the biggest issue she raises with potential clients is that they need to keep their expectations in check. There are many variables that go into how difficult it will be to remove a tattoo and they are not always evident on the first office visit. Removal could take three visits, or it could take a dozen visits.

RESULTS VARY

Black ink tattoos are typically the easiest to remove, but sometimes a black ink tattoo might not be what it appears.

Middleton was recently at a conference on advanced tattoo removal in Denver and she learned of a case of a man who expected a fairly easy removal, who actually required many more treatments than was expected.

Once clinicians removed a layer of black ink, they discovered a splotch of green ink, a pigment that is much harder for the laser to remove.

In other cases, people have discovered their tattoos are much easier to remove than was expected.

“People need to understand that it’s a work in progress, but the results that we have seen have been very promising,” Middleton said.

How heavy a hand the tattoo artist uses when applying the tattoo changes the difficulty of removal, also. Deep tattoos are harder to remove than those where the ink is closer to the surface.

ALSO A CLIENT

Middleton is also planning to undergo tattoo removal herself.

She has a tattoo of a feather on her ankle that she no longer wants.

“It changed over time,” she said. “I’ve had it for 23 years. At the time it seemed to make a lot of sense to me.”

She was on a trip with a group of friends and they decided to get tattoos together.

“It eventually no longer looked like what it was supposed to look like,” she said.

Middleton said she never considered tattoo removal until the latest generation of laser removal recently became available. Older tattoo removal processes were too invasive and could leave behind skin that looked scarred.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

Treatments start at around $150 and are not covered by insurance.

What’s left after a tattoo is removed with a laser isn’t a clean slate, though it’s closer to that than early generations of tattoo removal.

The treatments can as take a little as a minute for a small tattoo. The artwork should disappear after three to 10 treatments.

A mark on the skin will remain. Middleton said it’s like creating a little wound in the skin, and once the tattoo is gone, that blemish will be there in its place. It’s less noticeable than an unwanted tattoo, however. “Most people would rather have that than an ex-girlfriend’s name,” she said.

 
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