Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · New Feast
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New Feast

Torches Calories, Too

Mike Terrell - January 27th, 2014  

Food lovers who also cross country ski, take note. For two Saturdays in February, Treetops Resort and Spa in Gaylord is hosting its inaugural Skiable Feast.

The progressive ski/meal, held on Feb. 1 and 15 beginning at 11am, features a four kilometer tracked trail through rolling hills and pine forests along the Pigeon River on the resort’s property.

Stops along the way include an old bridge shelter and a couple of vintage cabins, where skiers will sample gourmet goodies prepared by Treetops’ culinary team.

Novices and experienced cross-country skiers will cruise at their own pace through Project Nature, an area that once held an outdoor zoo with exotic animals back in the early 1980s.

Project Nature fell on economic hard times, and Treetops, then owned by Harry Melling, purchased the remote tract of undeveloped acreage. Elk and deer have been spotted in the area and bobcat tracks have been seen along the river.

The cost of the event is $79 per person, which includes trail pass, transportation and five food stations paired with Michigan beers and wines. The Nordic Center in the Jones Pro Shop is the meeting place and first food station. There are assorted miniquiches and a Greek yogurt bar with lots of flavors to start.

Next, skiers will be bused to Project Nature, embarking on the trail from the Old Bridge shelter after sampling pastry treats and fruit kabobs.

A kilometer later, skiers will enjoy venison or white bean chicken chili and grilled vegetable and beef kabobs brushed with a house-made bourbon glaze.

The longest section is about three kilometers and meanders to a wilderness cabin near a pond. Organizers say this section is best for viewing wildlife. Pan fried cod sliders topped with coleslaw and tarragon tartar sauce will be served by an open fire.

A final half-kilometer ski takes skiers back to a bus, which circles back to the Nordic Center and the final food station. There, hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, beer, and wine will be served for skiers who want to unwind one final time.

For those who would like to stay overnight, Treetops has a package that includes a night’s lodging, breakfast, and feast. It starts from $146 per person, based on double occupancy.

The Skiable Feast is scheduled for two Saturdays in February: the 1st and the 15th. The feast starts at 11am and costs $79 per person. For more information, call Treetops Resort and Spa at (866) 348-5249.

 
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