Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Spawn of Cherry Capital Comic Con

An annual gathering of comic book fans in Traverse City has spawned a community of comic book creators.

Patrick Sullivan - February 10th, 2014  

Unhindered by their remote location, the group has attracted like-minded comic “nerds,” said writer Chris Meeuwes, who teamed up with artist Ryan Lee to create the dark alternate-world superhero comic called “The Naturals.”

The two met at a special Cherry Capital Con 2010 event through Ethan Van Sciver, an established comic book artist who has drawn DC Comics titles like “Green Lantern,” “Superman,” “Batman,” “New X-Men,” and “The Flash: Rebirth.”

“[Lee] brought his portfolio to show Ethan Van Sciver,” Meeuwes said. “And I looked at it and we just kind of talked because he was a new comic book nerd in the area that I’d never met. I thought he should become one of the group. I was like, this is really good.”

TRAVERSE CITY ON THE MAP

The artist and writer hit it off. Lee, 36, had just moved to Traverse City from downstate and wanted to explore a career in comics.

Meeuwes, 28, had worked for a couple of years at Top Comics, northern Lower Michigan’s only dedicated comic book shop. One of Top Comics’ owners, Michael Akerley, started Cherry Capital Con comic book convention in 2009.

Akerley said he hoped it would bring people like Lee and Meeuwes together.

“That was our goal. It was set up as a way to get artists and writers to meet. There’s a lot of talented people in the area,” Akerley said. “If that’s all it does, I’ll be thrilled.”

The Van Sciver event was just one of numerous high-profile happenings at C4 over the years. In 2012, the convention hosted Tony Moore, the artist behind the first six issues of the comic book “The Walking Dead,” which has become a hit television series on AMC.

ULTRA-VIOLENT, PALATABLE AND FUN

Lee and Meeuwes’ comic, “The Naturals,” is set in an alternate universe in an unspecified American city just after World War I. It is a dark and violent story about a murderous returning soldier and the alcohol-fueled trouble he leaves in his wake.

Like the best comic books, it’s both dreamlike and rooted in the real world.

Lee and Meeuwes say they are comfortable creating an ultra-violent fictional world.

“It’s a war story and it’s pretty dark, but some of the violence I have in there, by going over the top, I think it adds a little bit of levity to it,” Lee said. “We’re not trying to do a documentary. This isn’t a first-person memoir. This is comics and even when things are dark and horrific, we still want them to be palatable and fun.”

Lee and Meeuwes write a new multi-panel page and post it online every other week. They’ve completed the story’s first chapter, the size of an individual comic book, and they are well into the second chapter.

DRAWING FOR A LIVING

When Lee moved from Royal Oak to Traverse City a few years ago, he didn’t know what kind of like-minded people he might find. He saw the move north as a way to be somewhere good to raise a family.

He also thought he could develop his career as an artist.

“We had recently had a child and I worked in advertising for six and a half years before I moved up here,” he said. “I wanted to try drawing for a living again. Doing illustration. That’s what I went to school for and that’s what I did the first almost three years out of school.”

Lee’s wife got a job in Traverse City and the couple was able to move north.

Lee still works as a freelance commercial artist, but he is able to devote more of his time to comic book art.

“Obviously, no one is paying us to do this,” Lee said of “The Naturals.” “This is a passion project. It’s something fun to do for us.”

‘KIND OF LIKE CHEERS’

Meeuwes also came to Traverse City looking for something else.

In Cadillac, he developed a love for comic books even in the absence of access to them. He sort of stumbled upon superheroes.

“When I was growing up in Cadillac, we really didn’t have a comic store or anywhere that really sold them,” Meeuwes said. “But there was an older neighbor kid ... him and some of his friends were into the collector’s cards.”

Meeuwes started to collect superhero cards. He read the bios on the backs and figured out how the stories intersected.

“I guess that’s how I got into it. Not the traditional, ‘Oh, I read ‘Ironman,’ and some of this stuff,” he said.

In Traverse City, Meeuwees found the community he was looking for.

“It’s small. It’s kind of like ‘Cheers’ [TV show bar], where everybody knows each other,” he said. “We run into each other at the comic book shop every Wednesday, when they get new comics. It’s really tightknit, I guess.”

SUPERHEROES ON TWITTER

Lee’s and Meeuwe’s relationship with C4 has changed over the years.

Once they went as fans. Now they go as makers.

“I think people are really hardcore about it. The people who like comics are really invested in it up here, which translates into the success of the convention,” Lee said.

For Meeuwes the convention was, at first, part of his job.

“When it first started, I was kind of like Mike Akerley’s right-hand-man,” he said. “Then, when I started making my own comics, I kind of wanted to be on the other side of the table.”

They attend other Midwest comic cons to promote their work.

They also put up a website (naturalscomic.com) and spread word through Facebook.

They hope friends spread the word to friends of friends of friends.

They promote each new page on Twitter.

That’s a good way to get visitors, Lee said, because there are a lot of comics fans and creators there.

“Twitter has been huge,” Lee said.

“Twitter, for a comic book artist, because so many of these guys are freelancers who just work at home, Twitter has kind of become an office. It’s become a water cooler.”

 
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