Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 3-03-2014
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Letters 3-03-2014

- March 3rd, 2014  

Email letters to: info@northernexpress.com Please keep your letter under 300 words (one page). Only one letter per reader in a two month period will be accepted. may be edited for length or to correct factual errors. Letters must be signed to be considered for print and a phone number is required for verification. Faxed letters are not accepted.

Mental Health Cuts a Tragedy

Governor Snyder’s upbeat message on the 2015 budget left out an important fact: in a time of a state surplus, $180 million in general funds is being removed from community mental health programs. The reason for this is simple. Optimism about coverage under Healthy Michigan (Medicaid expansion) has led the administration to assume that mental health clients currently being served with general fund dollars will be eligible for expanded Medicaid. But it is not at all clear this is true, and without thoughtful implementation of this new benefit, many Michigan residents could be left without coverage.

Enrollment in the Healthy Michigan program will take months to “ramp up” to the estimated 400,000 persons projected as eligible, and it’s starting late. Money must be available to support services provided to these people until their Medicaid is effective. Second, some uninsured people still will not qualify for Medicaid, even with revised eligibility criteria. Changes made to the federal program by the state may make the program less attractive or simply impossible to qualify for. Third, the estimates of resources still needed by CMH programs after the implementation of Healthy Michigan were too low.

Public mental health agencies were enthusiastic supporters of Healthy Michigan, and lobbied hard for its passage.

It is a necessary program for poor Michigan residents. But it is not right to claim state savings by reducing support for community mental health programs, especially until it is clear what enrollment will be. At North Country Community Mental Health, one out of every two persons who applies for services does not have Medicaid. Some are served, but many are turned away. Many more would remain unserved with the proposed 65% reduction in state funding, and that would indeed be a tragedy.

Alexis Kaczynski • Director, North Country Community Mental Health

Minimum Wage Hike Deserves Second Thought

Should the minimum wage be raised? There are good reasons for conservatives who worry about budget deficits to support an increase.

Let’s do the math: The current minimum wage in Michigan is $7.40 per hour. This comes to $15,392 for a full-time worker (40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year). Most minimum-wage workers are not teenagers but adults, many with families. Because $15,392 is clearly not enough to support a family, many minimum-wage workers turn to taxpayer-funded programs, including SNAP (what used to be called food stamps), Medicaid, subsidized child care, and/or subsidized housing.

A minimum wage of $10.10 an hour comes to $21,008 annually for a full-time worker. Still dicey for a family, but two such wages would allow workers to get by with far less of the taxpayer-funded assistance programs that conservatives oppose.

Finally, of course, there is also a moral aspect to this question. No one who works full-time should have to live in poverty, nor should we be willing to continue subsidizing businesses that cannot or will not pay their employees a living wage.

Alice Littlefield • Omena

Lots to Lose, Little to Gain in Land Swap

When rumors started that St. Mary’s Cement wanted to make a new entrance to Fisherman’s Island State Park and close Bells Bay Road, it seemed too outrageous to be taken seriously. But St. Mary’s has lobbied government for two years and has proposed a “land swap” to obtain 190 acres of Fisherman’s Island State Park and the county road.

What would the public lose?

• Bells Bay Road to Lake Michigan, the last bridge through St. Mary’s quarries to our state park.

• Access to the overlook of Lake Michigan and free parking at the end of Bells Bay Road.

• The most popular year round trails and 190 acres of beautiful forest.

• Access to Fisherman’s Island State Park from the new Lake to Lake Charlevoix Multi-use Trail. A $285 thousand grant will complete the trail To Bells Bay Road this summer.

• Six of our favorite campgrounds.

• The woodland buffer that protects the camps from the quarry operation.

• Access to the magnificent shale outcroppings that reach far into Lake Michigan.

• Our favorite place, a place of generations of memories.

And what would we gain?

• A 35 acre, 3,000 foot section of McGeach Creek that has intermittent flow and a berm where mining has occurred.

• A 185 acre, inland, timbered, mostly scrub shrub parcel.

• St. Mary’s has offered to build a new Ranger Station and to help create new campground spots and roads.

St. Mary’s has provided jobs, help in the community, and donated the old Medusa Spur for the Lake to Lake Charlevoix Trail. But their request to take Bells Bay Road and 190 acres of state park woodlands is ill advised. We cannot sell, swap or give away state land without compelling need or benefit. We hope St. Mary’s will withdraw its request.

JoAnne Beemon • Charlevoix MI

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