Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The new Church Music
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The new Church Music

Ross Boissoneau - March 3rd, 2014  

Church praise bands hardly seem to be the most controversial topic in a world grappling with global warming and gay rights.

But for centuries, parishioners have fought for – and against – everything from an innocent 18th century organ to the ‘70sera “demon drums.” Even today, churches still struggle to find a musical sweet spot for parishioners seeking new ways to worship … or the comforting traditions they grew up with.

Traditional or Contemporary

Some churches try to play it both ways. At Gaylord E-Free Church, Worship Arts Director Joshua Rupp says they try to accommodate worshipers who favor contemporary music as well as those who find traditional hymns more fulfilling.

To do this, the church has two separate services that meld into one.

Rupp leads a praise band that includes guitars, bass, keyboards and drums, occasionally accompanied by the flute, trombone or dulcimer. At the same time in another part of the church, a more traditional service takes place with piano and hymns.

The two come together midway through the service, so all those attending can hear the pastor’s message.

“Our motto is ‘Meeting and moving,’” Rupp said. “We want to meet people where they are at, and move them to where God is.”

Tim Miller, Rupp’s friend and counterpart at Walloon Lake Community Church, said his church thought such an arrangement could work there, and they tried it this past fall through January. They had hoped it might serve to bring in people who weren’t currently attending church.

Miller says his church is now deciding on whether to institute such an arrangement on a permanent basis.

“We didn’t bring in those we targeted; but for others, it’s the voice of their heart,” he said.

Walloon Lake Community Church has a fairly typical band: piano, keyboards, bass, drums, lead guitar, rhythm guitar and several vocalists. Every three weeks they also enlist a small choir.

Prior to Walloon, Miller worked at a church at the University of Illinois campus.

“We had a full orchestra, a choir, a giant organ, we had bands,” he said. “Nothing was off the table musically.”

New Hope

At New Hope Community Church in Traverse City, Worship Pastor Rick Stewart oversees bands ranging from a group incorporating bass, guitar, keyboards and drums, to one with brass and woodwinds, even strings.

“Our normal praise band is a rhythm section and vocalists,” Stewart said. “Once a month we have a choir and a pop orchestra.”

The orchestra includes flute, clarinet, oboe, alto and tenor sax, trumpet, trombone, tuba and violin and cello.

In addition to the Traverse City location, New Hope also has a church in Bellaire. There the praise band is not nearly so large, but the service and the music are virtually the same. And the music they play? “Most of our music is modern,” says Stewart.

Whatever the instrumentation or music, Stewart says the goal remains the same.

“We sing songs to God and about God,” he said.

Still the Organ

Not that every church has gone the praise band route. Peter Bergin, the music director at St. Philip Neri Catholic Church in Empire, says the Catholic Mass ties directly into a more traditional style of worship.

“It’s a little easier in that it provides a guide to every celebration,” he said.

While he typically bases the worship music around his organ or piano with a cantor, he occasionally includes other instruments. Bergin says the decision about what to select and how to best present it starts with prayer.

“It’s about the readings, how relevant it [the music] is to the scriptural theme,” he said is decisions also are based on what’s available.

“Sometimes it’s pragmatic – I have a flute, I don’t have a flute,” he said.

Bergin says he does find ways to incorporate more modern sounds into the Mass.

“There are times in the service for a solo or duet,” he said. “That might not be as traditional.”

He also plays for occasions such as weddings and funerals at other churches where he works with their style of music.

“At another church I follow their tradition, what they’re most comfortable with,” Bergin said.

Mulitmedia Preaching

Depending on the church, its service may include technology such as video or PowerPoint presentations in addition to the music. Stewart says whatever the means, the message remains the same.

“We’re here to give praise to God,” he said.

The age of the worshipers also may impact the perspective and selections. Rupp says younger members of a congregation grew up with a more syncopated style of music that they find very natural, while older people are most comfortable with the hymns based on the downbeat.

Bergin puts it more succinctly. “The millennials look at music composed in the 1970s as traditional,” he said with a laugh. “Older people think of music from the 70s as contemporary.”

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