Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Letters 3-17-14

- March 17th, 2014  

Email letters to: info@northernexpress.com Please keep your letter under 300 words (one page). Only one letter per reader in a two month period will be accepted. may be edited for length or to correct factual errors. Letters must be signed to be considered for print and a phone number is required for verification. Faxed letters are not accepted.

LITTER LESSONS

We are fortunate to live in America. We are required to act responsibly. Contribute to the SOLUTION.

RULE #1. Anything people throw on the ground that did not grow there or wasn’t there originally is unacceptable. If it is processed, it’s garbage.

What is litter? Cigarette butts, empty cigarette packages, paper cups, bags, flossers, candy wrappers, cans, bottles, fast food debris, everything indicated in RULE #1.

Cover garbage containers left on the road. In all windy conditions cover with a heavy weight. YOU are liable for your garbage.

RULE #2. All commercial vehicles must not throw their garbage on the ground. It doesn’t matter who you are or who you work for. Put a bag in your truck and use it for garbage. Place it in an AUTHORIZED container. My street, yard, neighborhood or County grounds are NOT AUTHORIZED.

WE are fortunate to live in the United States. Every person lucky enough to live in this country which I served for nearly 30 years is entitled to treat it with respect. Service to God and community has no expiration date. Pass the message to others. YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT I’M TALKING ABOUT.

Terry Witt • Williamsburg

REAL JOBS IN INDIAN RIVER

The past president of Monster Beverage Company has stated publicly on several occasions that he wants to build a racetrack on Griswold Mountain in order to “give back” to Indian River.

I am a retired public health nurse with over twenty years of service to the people of Cheboygan County. As a public health nurse I had the privilege of working with many community leaders as part of several different forums which sought to improve the health and well-being of our residents.

During these carefully constructed “needs assessments” never once did the Cheboygan County leaders come to the conclusion that what this county needs more than anything else is a world class motocross racetrack.

Many recurring themes were present, however. High on our list were improved health care and better access to it; safer places for our children to play and for our seniors to exercise; and better nutrition for everyone. Most importantly, the one need that was always identified was the creation of more long-term high-paying jobs with health benefits.

If the Griswold Mountain developer truly wants to give back to his community, he could indeed address this need. As a board member of the Monster Beverage Company, he could encourage his company to create real jobs in Indian River. They could possibly build a bottling plant or a distribution center at the Indian River Industrial Park, where many new employees would have year-round full-time employment.

The developer truly could be instrumental in helping to bring prosperity to Indian River. But building a race-track will not address this need. In the developer’s own words, putting on a motocross race would be like having a “traveling circus” come to town. Unfortunately, when the circus is gone, so are the jobs.

Pam Miller • Indian River

RISE OF INEQUALITY

Since the 1970s the income earned by the top fifth of Americans has risen from 40 percent to 47 percent of total income. It is difficult to say that this level of inequality is a bad thing; many of the reasons are clear. People tend to have lower incomes when they are young, higher income in middle age, and lower incomes when elderly. Even year-to-year, there are shifts between rich and poor, some people making money a top priority in their lives, while others do not.

The concern is not in inequality itself, but rather the increase in income inequality since the 1970s. The reason for the rise is due to the change in information technology that has favored the productivity of highly skilled worker. Inflation adjusted, the current minimum wage is lower than it was in the 1970s. Household incomes have become more unequal because of changes in family patterns, including the rise of singleparent families and the rise of high-earners marrying each other. Lastly, globalization has played a minor role in job loss to countries paying lower wages.

While higher taxes on the rich can be used to equalize, the share of federal taxes paid by those with high incomes is fairly high by the standard of recent decades. An alternative method of reducing inequality would be to increase government spending. This could be accomplished by expanding direct payments to the working poor, via an earned income credit and/or an increase in the minimum wage. Another way would be to increase government spending on infrastructure, which could create higher paying jobs.

Ronald Marshall • Petoskey

CORRECTIONS: In the March 3 issue, we mistakenly noted that Brett and Kristina Nichols of Elevated Arts had created the Music Together program. In fact, Music Together is an international program developed in the 1980s. We apologize for any confusion.

In the March 10 issue on the Style page we ran an incorrect price for a sweater at Ellas. The correct price is $216.

 
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