Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · News · Spring Fever Hits the Ramsdell
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Spring Fever Hits the Ramsdell

Kristi Kates - March 17th, 2014  

Shoveling snow during the drab late winter days inspired Brian Garcia to spread around a little sunshine in Manistee last March.

Garcia used the website Kickstarter to rally 80 backers, funding the first-ever Spring and All Festival at the historic Ramsdell Theatre.

Now, he’s about ready to launch round two on March 22.

“I wanted a way to bring people together … to honor the community’s hard work at keeping Manistee alive,” Garcia said about the event, which celebrates the arts through music. “Live music is emotional and inspiring.”

MANISTEE MISSION

Garcia said he was initially inspired by “The Manistee River Song” by Michigan native Jim Crockett and “Spring and All” by folk singer Greg Brown.

“Both are music heroes, and their songs became the vehicle for the festival,” he said. “Music has got me through a lot of tough times, and helped celebrate good times too. That’s what I hope this festival does for people, and why it’s so powerful to me.”

The festival’s underlying mission is to bring the Manistee arts community together.

“Having musicians, organizations, and businesses all at the Ramsdell is what we are all about,” said Michael Terry, executive director for the 111-year-old theatre.

“It’s a place for people and artists to interact with each other. Our mission is to provide meaningful and memorable life experiences through the arts and community.”

And that’s just what Garcia and his festival hope to do.

NATURAL RESOURCES

In addition to the music, there will be exhibits in the theatre’s Grand Ballroom that feature canoe builders, artisans, photographers, painters, wildlife experts, local conservation groups, and Manistee National Forest Service representatives – even Smokey the Bear.

“Lake Michigan, the Manistee River and the surrounding forests are part of what makes us and this area unique,” Terry said. “The exhibits and the music celebrate those who work to preserve these natural resources, and help make our community sustainable.”

Admission to the Ballroom is free to all, and local food resources will be on site, too, at the Spring and All Food and Beverage Garden, a farmer’s market featuring local Michigan foods from regional farms, including soups, salads, and sandwiches, plus a selection of non-alcoholic beverages.

MUSIC EVERYWHERE

The musical performances kick off at noon with Jim Crockett appearing first, performing “The Manistee River Song.”

Following Crockett is Goodboy! featuring Patrick Niemisto, Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellies; then Australian musician Harper; with local musicians on stage from 5 to 6:30pm.

Michigan-born Drew Nelson, an Americana/roots rock storyteller, follows; then Lansing band Lincoln County Express, a roots and blues outfit featuring Jen Sygit and Sam Corbin, goes on.

“There will be live music in every corner of the Ramsdell as people ‘busk’ in hallways and stairwells,” Garcia said. “You won’t be able to go anywhere in the Ramsdell without hearing live music.”

The festival is expected to end at 9pm with the day’s final concert, Joshua Davis and Friends.

“Davis’ show will be a great way to end a day filled with great music,” Terry said. “And I’m looking forward to helping create an environment and event in which people can enjoy and feel welcomed. That’s what I like about my job.”

Garcia said he’s looking forward to shining a light on his community theater, while seeing new and familiar faces come and enjoy the arts.

“What will also make this event meaningful to me is seeing all the diverse parts of our community come together and celebrate,” he said. “There are no strangers in this town – that’s the feeling here. Whether you were born and raised here, or just arrived today, you are part of Manistee.”

Manistee’s Spring and All Festival will take place at the Ramsdell Theatre on Sat., March 22. Doors open at 11:30am. Tickets are $15 in advance/$20 at the door, available at MyNorthTickets at (800) 836-0717 and online at ramsdelltheatre.org.

 
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