Letters

Letters 05-23-2016

Examine The Priorities Are you disgusted about closing schools, crumbling roads and bridges, and cuts everywhere? Investigate funding priorities of legislators. In 1985 at the request of President Reagan, Grover Norquist founded Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). For 30 years Norquist asked every federal and state candidate and incumbent to sign the pledge to vote against any increase in taxes. The cost of living has risen significantly since 1985; think houses, cars, health care, college, etc...

Make TC A Community For Children Let’s be that town that invests in children actively getting themselves to school in all of our neighborhoods. Let’s be that town that supports active, healthy, ready-to-learn children in all of our neighborhoods...

Where Are Real Christian Politicians? As a practicing Christian, I was very disappointed with the Rev. Dr. William C. Myers statements concerning the current presidential primaries (May 8). Instead of using the opportunity to share the message of Christ, he focused on Old Testament prophecies. Christ gave us a new commandment: to love one another...

Not A Great Plant Pick As outreach specialist for the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network and a citizen concerned about the health of our region’s natural areas, I was disappointed by the recent “Listen to the Local Experts” feature. When asked for their “best native plant pick,” three of the four garden centers referenced non-native plants including myrtle, which is incredibly invasive...

Truth About Plants Your feature, “listen to the local experts” contains an error that is not helpful for the birds and butterflies that try to live in northwest Michigan. Myrtle is not a native plant. The plant is also known as vinca and periwinkle...

Ask the Real Plant Experts This letter is written to express my serious concern about a recent “Listen To Your Local Experts” article where local nurseries suggested their favorite native plant. Three of the four suggested non-native plants and one suggested is an invasive and cause of serious damage to Michigan native plants in the woods. The article is both sad and alarming...

My Plant Picks In last week’s featured article “Listen to the Local Experts,” I was shocked at the responses from the local “experts” to the question about best native plant pick. Of the four “experts” two were completely wrong and one acknowledged that their pick, gingko tree, was from East Asia, only one responded with an excellent native plant, the serviceberry tree...

NOTE: Thank you to TC-based Eagle Eye Drone Service for the cover photo, taken high over Sixth Street in Traverse City.

Home · Articles · News · News · Spring Fever Hits the Ramsdell
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Spring Fever Hits the Ramsdell

Kristi Kates - March 17th, 2014  

Shoveling snow during the drab late winter days inspired Brian Garcia to spread around a little sunshine in Manistee last March.

Garcia used the website Kickstarter to rally 80 backers, funding the first-ever Spring and All Festival at the historic Ramsdell Theatre.

Now, he’s about ready to launch round two on March 22.

“I wanted a way to bring people together … to honor the community’s hard work at keeping Manistee alive,” Garcia said about the event, which celebrates the arts through music. “Live music is emotional and inspiring.”

MANISTEE MISSION

Garcia said he was initially inspired by “The Manistee River Song” by Michigan native Jim Crockett and “Spring and All” by folk singer Greg Brown.

“Both are music heroes, and their songs became the vehicle for the festival,” he said. “Music has got me through a lot of tough times, and helped celebrate good times too. That’s what I hope this festival does for people, and why it’s so powerful to me.”

The festival’s underlying mission is to bring the Manistee arts community together.

“Having musicians, organizations, and businesses all at the Ramsdell is what we are all about,” said Michael Terry, executive director for the 111-year-old theatre.

“It’s a place for people and artists to interact with each other. Our mission is to provide meaningful and memorable life experiences through the arts and community.”

And that’s just what Garcia and his festival hope to do.

NATURAL RESOURCES

In addition to the music, there will be exhibits in the theatre’s Grand Ballroom that feature canoe builders, artisans, photographers, painters, wildlife experts, local conservation groups, and Manistee National Forest Service representatives – even Smokey the Bear.

“Lake Michigan, the Manistee River and the surrounding forests are part of what makes us and this area unique,” Terry said. “The exhibits and the music celebrate those who work to preserve these natural resources, and help make our community sustainable.”

Admission to the Ballroom is free to all, and local food resources will be on site, too, at the Spring and All Food and Beverage Garden, a farmer’s market featuring local Michigan foods from regional farms, including soups, salads, and sandwiches, plus a selection of non-alcoholic beverages.

MUSIC EVERYWHERE

The musical performances kick off at noon with Jim Crockett appearing first, performing “The Manistee River Song.”

Following Crockett is Goodboy! featuring Patrick Niemisto, Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellies; then Australian musician Harper; with local musicians on stage from 5 to 6:30pm.

Michigan-born Drew Nelson, an Americana/roots rock storyteller, follows; then Lansing band Lincoln County Express, a roots and blues outfit featuring Jen Sygit and Sam Corbin, goes on.

“There will be live music in every corner of the Ramsdell as people ‘busk’ in hallways and stairwells,” Garcia said. “You won’t be able to go anywhere in the Ramsdell without hearing live music.”

The festival is expected to end at 9pm with the day’s final concert, Joshua Davis and Friends.

“Davis’ show will be a great way to end a day filled with great music,” Terry said. “And I’m looking forward to helping create an environment and event in which people can enjoy and feel welcomed. That’s what I like about my job.”

Garcia said he’s looking forward to shining a light on his community theater, while seeing new and familiar faces come and enjoy the arts.

“What will also make this event meaningful to me is seeing all the diverse parts of our community come together and celebrate,” he said. “There are no strangers in this town – that’s the feeling here. Whether you were born and raised here, or just arrived today, you are part of Manistee.”

Manistee’s Spring and All Festival will take place at the Ramsdell Theatre on Sat., March 22. Doors open at 11:30am. Tickets are $15 in advance/$20 at the door, available at MyNorthTickets at (800) 836-0717 and online at ramsdelltheatre.org.

 
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