Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · A Life of Fiber
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A Life of Fiber

Insurance was a less than perfect fit for Marcia Koppa, who left her job when the urge to get creative struck her.

Al Parker - March 31st, 2014  


“About 15 years ago, I felt a real need to do something artistic,” said Koppa, who lives just outside of Grayling. “I tried sketching and found out I couldn’t sketch. So if I couldn’t sketch, how could I possibly paint?” Koppa turned to weaving, turning out hundreds of scarves, vibrant table runners and wall hangings. Using silk, cotton, rayon chenille or linen, Koppa spends many hours each week at her 42-inch wide custom red oak floor loom.

Weaving can be a solitary art, so Koppa keeps in touch with other artists through the AuSable-Manistee Fiber Arts Guild. About a dozen guild members meet every month to share ideas, and catch up on news and trends in weaving.

HOW I GOT STARTED

While traveling out east with a friend who weaves, the notion took root as we stayed with her mother, who also weaves. Plus we shopped at one of the larger weaving supply stores in the country so that must have ‘pushed me over the edge; so to speak. Eventually I took a class and that was it. I also went to The Sievers School of Fiber Arts in Washington Island, Wis. I mistakenly signed up for an advanced class and quickly learned I didn’t know what I was doing. So I took a beginning class and everything was fine after that.

THE STORY BEHIND MY ART, MY INSPIRATION

The planning can be fun. I’m a little more free form than those who strictly fol low a pattern. This winter I had a problem with a particular weave, but other than that everything usually goes smoothly.

I like the process of weaving as much as the results. There are so many variables in designing a piece, from type and size of yarn to the density, or sett, and the weave structure itself. Much of my inspiration comes from nature, traveling and even family photos.

WORK I’M MOST PROUD OF

Sharing my work with family and friends. There’s nothing like giving a piece of yourself to another person for them to appreciate and wear.

YOU WON’T BELIEVE

One of the biggest surprises for people, and myself in the beginning is how much time there is in getting the loom prepared before the actual weaving begins. It can take days to design on paper, wind the warp, the yarn that goes on the loom, wind the warp on to the loom and then thread it through and tie it on. The actual weaving step is usually the fastest and easiest part of the process.

MY FAVORITE ARTIST

No one artist in particular but those whose work is well-crafted, understated and speaks with simplicity.

ADVICE FOR ASPIRING ARTISTS

Beginners should realize that weaving takes a bit of patience. There’s a lot to learn, a steep learning curve. But then play and enjoy the process. Be true to yourself and let the work speak to you.

MY WORK CAN BE SEEN/PURCHASED

I don’t display at a lot of galleries, contests or shows. I just like to play with my loom. Others enter competitions, but I just like to play. All of my work can be found in Grayling at the Main Branch Gallery or online at mainbranchgallery.com.

 
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