Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Art · A Life of Fiber
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A Life of Fiber

Insurance was a less than perfect fit for Marcia Koppa, who left her job when the urge to get creative struck her.

Al Parker - March 31st, 2014  


“About 15 years ago, I felt a real need to do something artistic,” said Koppa, who lives just outside of Grayling. “I tried sketching and found out I couldn’t sketch. So if I couldn’t sketch, how could I possibly paint?” Koppa turned to weaving, turning out hundreds of scarves, vibrant table runners and wall hangings. Using silk, cotton, rayon chenille or linen, Koppa spends many hours each week at her 42-inch wide custom red oak floor loom.

Weaving can be a solitary art, so Koppa keeps in touch with other artists through the AuSable-Manistee Fiber Arts Guild. About a dozen guild members meet every month to share ideas, and catch up on news and trends in weaving.

HOW I GOT STARTED

While traveling out east with a friend who weaves, the notion took root as we stayed with her mother, who also weaves. Plus we shopped at one of the larger weaving supply stores in the country so that must have ‘pushed me over the edge; so to speak. Eventually I took a class and that was it. I also went to The Sievers School of Fiber Arts in Washington Island, Wis. I mistakenly signed up for an advanced class and quickly learned I didn’t know what I was doing. So I took a beginning class and everything was fine after that.

THE STORY BEHIND MY ART, MY INSPIRATION

The planning can be fun. I’m a little more free form than those who strictly fol low a pattern. This winter I had a problem with a particular weave, but other than that everything usually goes smoothly.

I like the process of weaving as much as the results. There are so many variables in designing a piece, from type and size of yarn to the density, or sett, and the weave structure itself. Much of my inspiration comes from nature, traveling and even family photos.

WORK I’M MOST PROUD OF

Sharing my work with family and friends. There’s nothing like giving a piece of yourself to another person for them to appreciate and wear.

YOU WON’T BELIEVE

One of the biggest surprises for people, and myself in the beginning is how much time there is in getting the loom prepared before the actual weaving begins. It can take days to design on paper, wind the warp, the yarn that goes on the loom, wind the warp on to the loom and then thread it through and tie it on. The actual weaving step is usually the fastest and easiest part of the process.

MY FAVORITE ARTIST

No one artist in particular but those whose work is well-crafted, understated and speaks with simplicity.

ADVICE FOR ASPIRING ARTISTS

Beginners should realize that weaving takes a bit of patience. There’s a lot to learn, a steep learning curve. But then play and enjoy the process. Be true to yourself and let the work speak to you.

MY WORK CAN BE SEEN/PURCHASED

I don’t display at a lot of galleries, contests or shows. I just like to play with my loom. Others enter competitions, but I just like to play. All of my work can be found in Grayling at the Main Branch Gallery or online at mainbranchgallery.com.

 
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