Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Features · Edgy “Rain” Hits Studio...
. . . .

Edgy “Rain” Hits Studio Theatre

Ross Boissoneau - March 31st, 2014  

Actors Daniel Craig and Hugh Jackman famously tackled Keith Huff’s “A Steady Rain” on Broadway a few years ago; now it’s Brett Nichols’ and David Richey’s turn.

“A Steady Rain” is a 90-minute play that, through conversation between two Chicago cops who are best friends, touches on a psycho killer, torture, car chases, and illicit sex.

“It’s in your face, kind of edgy,” said Nichols, a retired police officer.

But the plot is more twisted than anything Nichols faced on the job.

“Joey” and “Denny” have been best friends for years, but their relationship is complicated. Denny is a racist who cheats on his wife with a prostitute on their beat, while Joey has a drinking problem and is in love with Denny’s wife.

The two come into conflict with one another and their superiors after they chase a pimp who shot into Denny’s house, injuring his son. Along the way they return a scared Vietnamese boy to his uncle, with tragic results. In relating the events the two confront scary truths about one another and themselves.

The two characters sometimes interact, but much of the play consists of monologues. The audience must decide who the characters are addressing, whether one another, their superiors, or the audience itself.

Director Nichole Case says the sparse props and the studio’s intimacy presented challenges.

“There are no bells or whistles, no costumes, no dramatic sets,” she said, adding that the props consist of a table and two chairs. “There’s not a lot of action on stage.”

Seating is nearly in the round, which Case says occasionally puts the actors’ backs to the audience.

However, Case says the strength of the show is in the writing and the actors.

“The actors are phenomenal,” she said. When it premiered on Broadway with Craig and Jackman, “A Steady Rain” broke the record for the highest weekly gross of a non-musical production on Broadway.

“It’s a great show,” Nichols said. “It’s got layers.”

Performances of “A Steady Rain” are April 4-5, 10-13, 17-19, and 26. The Old Town Playhouse’s Studio Theatre is located at 620 Railroad Place on the corner of E. Eighth St. and Woodmere Ave. For tickets, visit oldtownplayhouse.com or mynorthtickets.com.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close