Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Edgy “Rain” Hits Studio...
. . . .

Edgy “Rain” Hits Studio Theatre

Ross Boissoneau - March 31st, 2014  

Actors Daniel Craig and Hugh Jackman famously tackled Keith Huff’s “A Steady Rain” on Broadway a few years ago; now it’s Brett Nichols’ and David Richey’s turn.

“A Steady Rain” is a 90-minute play that, through conversation between two Chicago cops who are best friends, touches on a psycho killer, torture, car chases, and illicit sex.

“It’s in your face, kind of edgy,” said Nichols, a retired police officer.

But the plot is more twisted than anything Nichols faced on the job.

“Joey” and “Denny” have been best friends for years, but their relationship is complicated. Denny is a racist who cheats on his wife with a prostitute on their beat, while Joey has a drinking problem and is in love with Denny’s wife.

The two come into conflict with one another and their superiors after they chase a pimp who shot into Denny’s house, injuring his son. Along the way they return a scared Vietnamese boy to his uncle, with tragic results. In relating the events the two confront scary truths about one another and themselves.

The two characters sometimes interact, but much of the play consists of monologues. The audience must decide who the characters are addressing, whether one another, their superiors, or the audience itself.

Director Nichole Case says the sparse props and the studio’s intimacy presented challenges.

“There are no bells or whistles, no costumes, no dramatic sets,” she said, adding that the props consist of a table and two chairs. “There’s not a lot of action on stage.”

Seating is nearly in the round, which Case says occasionally puts the actors’ backs to the audience.

However, Case says the strength of the show is in the writing and the actors.

“The actors are phenomenal,” she said. When it premiered on Broadway with Craig and Jackman, “A Steady Rain” broke the record for the highest weekly gross of a non-musical production on Broadway.

“It’s a great show,” Nichols said. “It’s got layers.”

Performances of “A Steady Rain” are April 4-5, 10-13, 17-19, and 26. The Old Town Playhouse’s Studio Theatre is located at 620 Railroad Place on the corner of E. Eighth St. and Woodmere Ave. For tickets, visit oldtownplayhouse.com or mynorthtickets.com.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close