Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Rollin’ Down the River,...
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Rollin’ Down the River, Beautifully

River drifters and fly fishers, get on the wait list now: It takes three months to build a custom Croff Craft drift boat.

Kristi Kates - April 7th, 2014  

The wooden works of art start at $14,000 and are the widest, most stable, small boats on the market. That’s good news for those who like to drift tight water, casting for fish on two feet.

DESIGNING DRIFT BOATS

As a boy in northern Michigan, Croff began woodworking with an uncle.

“There was no end to what could be created with wood,” Croff said, “and I was constantly experimenting.”

Fishing was also a favorite pastime, as Croff and his brother used to cast flies for brook trout in Silver Creek.

“A lot of time was spent cruising the banks of the rivers, wading and trying to catch that elusive trout,” he said. “Nighttime fishing proved more successful, but wading at night can be treacherous.”

Croff decided to build a small, stable boat that could quietly navigate those evening waters.

“[It had to be] steady enough to stand and fish from it,” he said. “It also had to draft very little water in order to move atop the logs, rocks, and deadheads that are common in our rivers.”

A drift boat, or flat-bottomed craft with flared sides, was the likely answer. But all the models Croff knew of were too big to navigate the small rivers in his backyard.

“So I decided to build one,” he said. “I drew out a quick design on a napkin, and started building.”

COOL CRUISING

From those humble beginnings, Croff Craft Custom Driftboats began.

Very similar to the classic Mackenzie drift boat design, Croff’s boats are wider – 60 inches at the bottom, creating “excellent stability,” Croff said.

“We build the widest small boat on the market,” he said. “The cedar wood helps keep the weight down to create less draft, and the bottom is constructed with a rocker that enables the boat to spin at its center for easier control while floating.”

Built for both rivers and small lakes, the boats can also be modified with a transom to allow for a small motor.

While fishermen love them, the boats aren’t “just” for fishing.

“Fishing is only one activity,” Croff said.

“Many enjoy the boats for a leisure float, or cruise on the lake.”

Though the boats are primarily made from cedar, there are also walnut and some other exotic woods in places that need denser material, giving the hulls contrast and color.

CUSTOM CRAFTSMANSHIP

Croff said the building process is complex.

“Cedar planks are cut, glued, fiberglassed, and epoxied together to construct the bottom of the boat,” he said. “The sides are shaped in a similar manner and joined to the bottom, where the decks are built in.”

Rails strengthen the design, the bow and stern are made, and then the oar locks and boxes for the seats are built and installed.

The boat is then taped off and sprayed inside and out with protective polyurethane. All the wood is sanded and coated with varnish, and finally, the seats are constructed from walnut and woven with parachute cord.

“My hands touch every inch of the boat many times before it is finished,” he said, “and no two boats are alike.”

Croff considers each client’s boat an original piece of work, so custom means custom. Croff will build to suit.

To acquire a Croff Craft Driftboat, all it takes is a phone call to get things moving, although there is a wait list since the boats are made one at a time.

“In every boat I build there is a lot of blood, sweat, and tears … literally. I am the designer, engineer, builder, and finish guy,” he said. “But I absolutely love what I do, and try very hard to make that love show itself in the finished product.”

For more information on Croff Craft Custom Driftboats and the craftsmanship of Phil Croff, visit croffcraft.com or call (231) 330-5762.

 
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