Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Tibetan Monks Perform at Dennos

An intricate piece of art using grains of colored sand will be destroyed upon completion … exactly according to plan.

Ross Boissoneau - April 14th, 2014  

The sand mandala – and its destruction – is only part of a special visit to The Dennos Museum Center by the famed multiphonic singers of Drepung Loseling monastery.

Endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and healing through sacred performing art, the Tibetan Buddhist monks have performed in many of America’s greatest theaters and music halls. From April 14-19, the monks will chant, play music, and create the intricate mandala. The visit culminates in a closing ceremony concert, “Sacred Music Sacred Dance for World Healing,” where the monks, dressed in colorful costumes and masks, perform special music and sacred dances.

The music includes multiphonic singing, wherein one monk sings three notes at once. The Tibetans are the only culture on earth that cultivates this ability, which reshapes the vocal cavity, intensifying the natural overtones of the voice.

They also play traditional instruments such as 10-foot long dung-chen horns (sometimes compared to the trumpeting of elephants), drums, bells, cymbals and gyaling trumpets, the predecessor of the modern oboe.

In the days leading up to the concert, the monks will painstakingly create a mandala sand painting in the museum’s sculpture court. A mandala is a Hindu or Buddhist graphic symbol of the universe. The basic form of most mandalas is a square with four gates, containing a circle with a center point. Each gate is in the general shape of a T.

The lamas first draw an outline of the mandala on a wooden platform. On the following days, millions of grains of colored sand are painstakingly laid into place. Each monk holds a traditional metal funnel called a chakpur while running a metal rod on its grated surface. The vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid onto the platform.

Traditionally, most sand mandalas are destroyed shortly after their completion. This is done as a metaphor for the impermanence of life. The sands are swept up and placed in an urn.

Then, to fulfill the function of healing, half is carried to a nearby body of water. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.

The other portion of the sand will be distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony concert.

The visit by the monks is to spread a special message, said Gala Rinpoche, a resident teacher and director of programs for the monks at the American seat of the Drepung Loseling Monastery in Atlanta, GA.

“Peace, love, compassion, tolerance and forgiveness,” he said. “That is all our mission.”

The Buddhist spiritual teachers, or Dalai Lamas, had long held political authority in Tibet, but eight years after China invaded Tibet in 1951, the Dalai Lama fled to India.

“We have been in exile since 1959,” Rinpoche said. “We try to preserve and share our culture in exile.”

Rinpoche said the monks see the music as part of what they call “taming the untamed mind.” They believe that negative emotions are the source of all suffering, and the week of creation and performance is meant to countermand those negative emotions.

Since first touring in 1988-89, the Mystical Arts of Tibet has generated a loyal and ever-expanding audience. Their tours have enabled them to continue spreading the word about their culture and their continued exile from their homeland.

“We are very fortunate. We have successful support from our Western friends,” Rinpoche said. “We still have a huge response wherever we go.”

In addition to their solo performances, the monks have performed with a number of well-known musicians in a variety of genres: Kitaro, Paul Simon, Philip Glass, and the Beastie Boys, among others. Their music has also been featured in films.

The tour is endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and has three basic purposes: to make a contribution to world peace and healing; to generate a greater awareness of the endangered Tibetan civilization; and to raise support for the Tibetan refugee community in India.

In addition to the monks’ mandala, members of the public will also be able to create a community mandala. Visitors will be able to add colored sand to a design throughout the week.

Tickets to the Saturday performance are $25 in advance, $28 at the door and $22 for museum members plus fees. Tickets may be purchased by calling the museum box office at (231) 995-1553 or online at dennosmuseum.org, They are also available by calling 800-836-0717 or visiting mynorthtickets.com.

 
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