Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

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Rotary Show

72 YEARS OF LAUGHS

Ross Boissoneau - April 21st, 2014  


In 1942, Rotary Charities hosted its first musical and comedy show to raise money for the Grand Traverse region.

Now, with more than $2 million raised and funneled back to local causes, Rotarians are preparing once again to yuck it up.

This year’s takes place April 24-26 at Lars Hockstad Auditorium, and features sketches, musical guests and a chorus of Rotarians.

“It’s a true variety show,” said Phil Murphy, executive director for the Old Town Playhouse and one of the writers and organizers of the show.

Murphy says the show has broadened its appeal over the years, with fewer insider jokes and more general entertainment.

“The sketches are less about Rotary and more about what is happening in the community,” he said.

While Murphy and other Rotarians plot out the general shape of the sketches, David Millross and Al Bonney begin the process of choosing the music. Mike Hunter crafts them into medleys for the chorus, a group of 40 to 50 Rotary members, with backing from a seven-piece band.

While the chorus and sketches remain the centerpieces, the show also showcases performers from across the region. This year they include the Accidentals; Blake Elliot; Drive South with Mary Sue Wilkinson and Roger Brown; Jenna Elsenheimer and Madison Hertel; Fiddling Around with Tom Allard and John Thompson, featuring Lindsey Boyajian; vocal group Quad Pro Quo; and Bennett.

Proceeds from ticket sales and program ads are used to fund projects in the Grand Traverse region. Chuck Downey, chair of the club’s Good Works Committee, says many of those are connected with Traverse City Area Public Schools, such as vocal and instrumental music performances outside the area.

Other groups that have benefited from funding include non-profits such as Goodwill and Food Rescue.

“I don’t think there’s a non-profit in town we haven’t been able to help in some way,” Downey said.

Tickets for the show start at $10. They are available at several locations in Traverse City, from Rotary Club members, or by going to mynorthtickets.com.

 
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