Letters

Letters 07-06-2015

Safety on the “Bridge to Nowhere” Grant Parsons wrote an articulate column in opposition to the proposed Traverse City pier at the mouth of the Boardman River. He cites issues such as limited access, lack of parking, increased congestion, environmental degradation, and pork barrel spending of tax dollars. I would add another to this list: public safety...

Vote Carefully A recent poll showed 84% of Michiganders support increasing Michigan’s renewable energy standard to at least 20% from the current 10%. Yet Representative Ray Franz has sponsored legislation to eliminate the standard. This out of touch position is reminiscent of Franz’s opposition to the Pure Michigan campaign and support for increased taxes on retirees....

Credit Where Credit Is Due I think you should do another article about the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund giving proper credit to all involved, not just Tom Washington. Many others were just as involved...

I’ve Changed My Mind The Supreme Court has determined that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. This has happened with breathtaking suddenness. It took 246 years for Americans to decide that slavery was wrong and abolish it, but it’s been only a couple of decades since any successful attempt was made to legalize same-sex marriage, and four years since a majority of the American public supported legalization...


Home · Articles · News · Music · Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with...
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Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with Mexican Music!

Kristi Kates - April 28th, 2014  

From the synth-grunge of Reacta to the electrified translations of Yibel Jme’tik Banamil, Cinco de Mayo is the perfect occasion to check out what Mexico’s offering up in the indie-rock department, and we’ve picked five great bands for you to start with.

REACTA

Hailing from Aguascalientes, Mexico, this band is currently as sizzling as the hot springs that radiate through the region they live in. Their new album, “Refraction,” just out this past February, was specifically written for their hometown fans. However, it’s so accessible and catchy they’re snagging new fans from all over the world.

Their sound recalls a mix of The Bravery, Gavin Rossdale, and vintage Incubus, although the grungy energy is all their own. Suggested Single: “Complication” Web: reacta.bandcamp.com

THE PLASTICS REVOLUTION

After seeing the Flaming Lips perform live in Mexico City, this six-piece outfit was formed, inspired by the FL’s cartoony persona and danceable tunes.

Blending electronica and pop with a cheerful and lively stage presence, they’re touring with tunes from their newest album, “King Bono vs Los Flight Simulators,” and bringing plenty of showmanship and props with them, from costumes and confetti to a disco-worthy light show. Suggested Single: “Light of Day” Web: facebook.com/theplasticsrevolutionmx

VICENTE GAYO

Also from Mexico City, the complex rhythms and patterns of math rock are mashed up with a little pop to form Vicente Gayo’s edgy, scratchy sound. It’s chock-full of dynamics and with just enough hook to keep you around until the next track.

Singer Alan Ortiz and his bandmates Joshua, Armando, and Javier don’t shy away from musical experimentation, and it’s paying off big for them, with airplay already happening on MTV Latino. Suggested Single: “Circuitos Doblados” Web: vicentegayo.com

ZOÉ

Cuernavaca, Mexico’s Zoé is an altpsychedelic band that has already snagged a couple of Latin Grammy Awards for their well-honed mix of ‘70s heft and ‘80s synths.

It’s all set solidly behind singer Larregui Leon’s boyish vocals; their cover of “Besame Mucho” flipped the Mexican bolero track into a whole new sound. Zoé’s latest (and fifth) studio album, “Programatron,” is said to be both their best and most experimental set to date.

Suggested Single: “Nada” Web: zoetheband.com

YIBEL JME’TIK BANAMIL

Their name translates to “Root of Earth,” and they’re led by frontman Valeriano Gomez. But they’re not a folk outfit.

These distinctive Mexican musicians sing their indie-rock-inflected songs in Tzotil, a language spoken by the indigenous Maya in Mexico’s Chiapas state. It’s their bid to help preserve the language via their music, and they do it with style, from their sharp electric guitar riffs to the matching ponchos they often wear on stage. Suggested Single: “Son Jlumaltik” Web: myspace.com/yibeljmetikbanamil


 
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