Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 100 Years of Haas
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100 Years of Haas

One of Michigan’s great men of classical music is getting celebrated in style.

Ross Boissoneau - April 28th, 2014  


Karl Haas, the longtime host of the syndicated radio program “Adventures in Good Music” and former president of Interlochen Center for the Arts, died in 2005 at the age of 91.

For his 100th birthday,  his children are hosting a tribute concert at the City Opera House to benefit the nonprofit Building Bridges with Music.

The program will begin with a 30-minute documentary on Karl Haas’s life, produced by Jeff Haas and his sister Alyce Haas. It tells the story of his musical career, how he came to America just ahead of the Nazi pogrom of the Jews, and how he came to be a fixture in so many people’s lives through his radio program.

“Adventures in Good Music” ran for 44 years; at its peak it aired on more than 650 radio stations. It boasted an average of 3.6 million listeners daily.

Karl Haas is the only classical music host to be inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame, and is one of only two radio personalities to receive two Peabody Awards (the other being the legendary Edward R. Murrow).

Following the documentary, Jeff Haas will take the stage, along with his Building Bridges quintet: Chris Lawrence (trumpet), Laurie Sears (sax and flute), Sean Dobbins (drums), and Marion Hayden (bass). They will be joined by special guests Marcus Belgrave on trumpet and his wife, vocalist Joan Belgrave.

Belgrave recorded and toured with numerous performers, appearing on several Motown records. He was a longtime sideman with Ray Charles, and has performed with Ella Fitzgerald, Charles Mingus, Eric Dolphy, McCoy Tyner, and on numerous occasions, Jeff Haas.

The set includes a number of Jeff Haas originals, as well as some classic jazz standards. Haas also promises some original material by Belgrave and possibly some surprises as well.

A portion of the proceeds from this event will benefit Building Bridges with Music and its mission of using the universal language of music to promote open mindedness, understanding and acceptance of people from different cultures, races and backgrounds.

The show starts at 7pm with the documentary. Tickets for the event begin at $18. For more information and to order tickets, visit cityoperahouse.org.

Karl Haas’s Piano Lost … Then Found

For his late father’s 100th birthday concert tribute, pianist and composer Jeff Haas will be playing the same piano Karl Haas played when he hosted “Adventures in Good Music” at the WJR studios in Detroit.

After Karl Haas left the WJR studios to continue the program at WCLV in Cleveland, the piano he had played on the show fell into disuse and eventually disrepair.

Jim Evola, a friend of Jeff ’s who owns a piano and restoration business based in the Detroit area (with a store in Traverse City), found out about the piano. After convincing WJR to donate it to him, he and his staff completely refurbished it.

Such a restoration typically costs several thousand dollars, but that didn’t even enter into consideration for Evola, he said.

“Sometimes things just line up and are the right thing to do,” he said.

The restoration was completed in time for Jeff to play it at the Detroit Institute of Arts in December, in conjunction with both Karl Haas’s 100th birthday and the 60th anniversary of the Chamber Music Society, which his father and his mother Trudie founded.

Evola then donated the piano to Building Bridges with Music, the non-profit Jeff Haas founded to promote peace and understanding in schools. He had it delivered to the headquarters of Building Bridges at the Circuit on 14th St., where Haas played it at a concert in February.

Jeff Haas said he was astounded when Evola first told him of the piano’s provenance.

“I had no idea,” he said. “I was totally surprised.”

 
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