Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Art · She’s a Natural
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She’s a Natural

The works of Emmet County artist T.L. Baumhardt often include lush green plants, earthy mushrooms, colorful flowers and – almost always – fairies.

Al Parker - May 5th, 2014  

“I’ve always been fond of fairies, but I must say that I did not consciously choose to paint fairies for a living,” she explains. “They seemed to somehow flutter into my life in a time of need, offering much healing and a fantastic channel for creative expression.”

Baumhardt’s creations begin with a pencil sketch of an outdoor scene, usually sketched from a photograph that she’s taken in woods or gardens near her home southeast of Petoskey.

Then she slowly begins the watercolor paintings, working on one creation at a time is her usual pattern. Once the scene is set, she adds a fairy presence. Some are smiling waifs; others shyly peek from behind mushrooms. All are delicately detailed and convey a sense of both the natural and supernatural.

HOW I GOT STARTED

Creativity has been an essential element of my existence for as long as I can remember – I’ve always enjoyed working with my hands and making things. As a child, however, drawing was never something that came easy and natural for me, and I can remember wishing – with much frustration – for the ability to draw.

Taking art classes at North Central Michigan College was a great experience, and one course in particular, a drawing and painting course, was especially helpful in the process of ‘learning to see’. Mostly though, I’d say that I’m a self-taught artist, and it wasn’t until fairly recently that I really began to focus my efforts on working professionally as an artist.

THE STORY BEHIND MY ART, MY INSPIRATION

Along with fairies, my greatest inspiration is nature. I love gardening and exploring Michigan’s north woods, from flowers, mushrooms, insects and animals to mosses and lichen, etc.

I am deeply moved by the beauty of this land. Inspiration often comes to me at the oddest times, when least expected, and it is lovely to grab hold of that moment and make something with it.

WORK I’M MOST PROUD OF

Something I really enjoy as a painter is experiencing the full circle of an inspiration and its finished piece of work. Sometimes the experience is difficult, when an idea is hard  to express, but when it all flows it is very satisfying, and those tend to be the pieces that I enjoy most.

One piece in particular, titled “Gathering Rose Hips,” is one of those pieces. I was actually working on a different piece of artwork when the inspiration for this piece called me. Something just kept whispering, “Rose hips… rose hips,” so I stopped the piece I was working on and started a piece with rose hips.

I enjoy this piece and the process was meaningful and felt good. It also turns out that my grandmother (age 97) passed away while working on this piece. She grew roses and loved them and was also a painter. So it is significant in that way as well.

YOU WON’T BELIEVE

I’m an avid cottage gardener, planting both veggies and flowers in our home. Some of my favorite flowers include lupines, poppies, lavender, foxglove and roses…oh, I love roses.

MY FAVORITE ARTIST

Two artists I admire greatly are Tasha Tudor and Beatrix Potter. I enjoy their art, in paint and story, but I believe it is mostly a combination of the work they did and the way in which they lived their lives that inspires me greatest.

The work of contemporary artist Alan Lee really moves me, and I am also fond of many artists and works of art belonging to the era of Victorian fairy painting.

ADVICE FOR ASPIRING ARTISTS

I think it is most important to be yourself and to do your best in anything one chooses to do in life. Being an artist is really a way of life and I think one must find contentment in doing the work, as much as in receiving anything that may come as a result of one’s work.

Patience, persistence and hard-work are important, as well as compassion, especially toward one’s self. It can be easy to get discouraged as artists, as we often look to the outside for feedback and approval, but I believe it is important to believe in yourself, stay true to who you are and to create what has the most meaning for you.

MY WORK CAN BE SEEN/PURCHASED

At The Northern Michigan Artists Market in Petoskey or via my website: snowfairyfarm.com.

 
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