Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

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Laughter and Tears at Old Town Playhouse

Ross Boissoneau - May 5th, 2014  

Auditions for Old Town Playhouse’s warmhearted tearjerker “Steel Magnolias” attracted 32 hopefuls for only six parts, a double-edged sword for its director.

“I had some fantastic talent,” said Denni Don Hunting. “I wondered, ‘How do I balance veterans with new blood?” Ultimately, she cast parts to both newcomers and seasoned veterans.

“The gals are just fantastic,” she said. The play, set mostly in a Louisiana beauty shop, revolves around six gossipy, warmhearted friends.

The friendship among the six is tested by not only their personalities but by illness, birth, and death. In the face of profound sadness, their bond strengthens with humor and warmth.

The 1987 play was based on the real-life experiences of playwright Robert Harling, whose sister died from diabetic complications following the birth of his nephew.

Advised to do so by a writer friend, he wrote a short story to give his nephew some understanding of his mother, then turned the story into a play.

The 1989 film starred Julia Roberts, Sally Field and Dolly Parton and is known for its spunky characters that support each other with laughs and love through life’s joyful – and horrible – moments.

“It deals not only with the warm and family part of friendship, but the hard and sad part,” said Hunting. “It’s not just funny lines in a beauty parlor. These are real good friends that stay together in good times and bad.”

“Steel Magnolias” runs from May 8-11 and May 15-17 at Old Town Playhouse in Traverse City. For show times and ticket information, visit oldtownplayhouse.com. The “Steel Magnolias” cast is Maryscott O’Connor (M’Lynn), Maria McKane (Truvy), Betsy Willis (Clairee), Jill Bert (Ouiser), Meaghan Jameson (Shelby), and Carly Anderson (Annell).

 
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