Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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History Jumps Off the Page in Emmet County

Dry history facts have been reimagined in glossy magazine form.

Kristi Kates - May 5th, 2014  

The four-part Essence of Emmet magazine series covers everything from the geographic changes that carved the top of Michigan’s mitten to the battles of Fort Michilimackinac and beyond.

The free, collectible series is a collaborative, historical project that’s bringing Emmet County’s history to vivid life.

CURATING CHALLENGES

The series was a project that began two years ago, said Beth Ann Eckerle, Emmet County’s director of communications.

“[The magazine’s authors] include representatives from numerous historical organizations from throughout the county, because of a common interest in preserving and promoting our area’s unique history,” she said.

At one of the group’s meetings, Eckerle suggested that they put together an historical series of publications – not just a timeline or dry “history lesson,” but a bright, glossy magazine that would really tell the stories of those who shaped the Emmet County area.

Her colleagues – among them, Mackinaw City historian Sandy Planisek, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians archives director Eric Hemenway, and Dark Sky Park director Mary Stewart Adams – volunteered to write articles from their respective time periods of expertise.

“So that’s what we did over the past year,” Eckerle said, “and what emerged is our first issue.”

Designed and edited by Eckerle, the magazine will be released once a year for four years.

This year’s issue, “Part I: Pre-Contact Through 1812,” will be followed by 2015’s “Wars 1812-1917,” 2016’s “The 20th Century 1918-1960,” and the final issue, “Modern Times 1961-Present.”

SELECTING STORIES

The first issue features a thoughtfully curated series of articles, images, and design.

“Emmet County’s history is one of the richest and most intriguing in the state of Michigan,” Eckerle said. “Here, cultures and countries gathered to change the face of Michigan.”

“Pre-Contact Through 1812” showcases the Native Americans that were the primary residents here, then the French, and ultimately the British.

Also featured is the geography of the region and where the remains of distant geological events can be found today.

There’s a piece on native place names, another on celestial phenomena, an article on “Warrior Poet” Arent DePeyster, and background on Fort Michilimackinac, which was an important and pivotal setting in those early days.

“Some pretty cool and unique perspectives are provided,” Eckerle said.

EXPLORING ERAS

The next issue will highlight a century of the greatest change in Emmet County, with land rights and treaties taking center stage, transportation changing the face of the landscape, homesteaders and tourists arriving, and the Civil War making an impact that connected the locals to that time period’s national scene.

“That era sees the early origins of marketing Northern Michigan as a tourism destination, when resorts like Bay View and Harbor Point were forming,” Eckerle said. “There are some little-known stories going in the next edition, too, including insights into the lifestyle of the era. The topics cover a very wide range during this century of contrasts.”

The final two editions will highlight how transportation became more established and the economy grew, as well as the places and people who have left lasting legacies here.

DEFINING DESIGN

Eckerle said she wanted to move away from how history is typically presented.

“I did not want to create a ‘flat’ history piece,” she said. “My goal was to use a lot of design elements that would make history engaging. The magazine is intentionally heavily focused on the people behind the stories, not just dates and locations – and it’s very colorful.”

Some of the design elements even help readers who may not be quite as into local history as others. A timeline helps place the stories on a continuum, and a section called “Points to Ponder” gives people real places they can go today to experience the historical locations that are featured in the articles.

“It’s a chance to connect with our history,” Eckerle said, “to sit in the same spot as our forebears and think, ‘What must it have been like to be here, at that time?’” Since announcing the publication, the Essence of Emmet team has distributed more than 3,000 copies of the first issue, which is available free of charge.

“The feedback on the magazine has been tremendous,” Eckerle said. “People love learning about the events that shaped this area that they love. We are so grateful that this leap-of-faith project has hit the mark, as we hoped it would.”

The Essence of Emmet magazines can be picked up at Suite 178 in the County Building at 200 Division Street in downtown Petoskey, or can be mailed upon request. They are available free of charge thanks to funding support from the Local Revenue Sharing Board. To request a copy, contact Beth Anne Eckerle at beckerle@emmetcounty.org, or call (231) 348- 1704. Online visit emmetcounty.org.

 
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