Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

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Mushrooms Rule! At the Morel Festival

Kristi Kates - May 12th, 2014  


A heated disagreement more than 50 years ago sparked Boyne City’s National Morel Mushroom Festival … maybe.

“I can’t verify this,” said Jim Baumann, executive director of the Boyne Area Chamber, “but it supposedly started with some guys arguing about who could pick the most morel mushrooms.”

Quoting Tony Williams, a five-time morel hunting champion, Baumann said the initial challenge mushroomed into something else entirely.

“That argument turned into, ‘Yeah, well, I’ll see you tomorrow morning,’” he said. “And eventually, it became, ‘Let’s invite other people.’”

WILD GASTRONOMY

The first fest took just two days. Now, the fungus fun encompasses an entire weekend stuffed with events.

At the Taste of Morels event on Friday night, 12 area restaurants and caterers will sell $3 morel hors d’oeuvres, which will be judged through both the Judges’ Choice and Peoples’ Choice.

“This is the signature event of the festival,” Baumann said. “It always draws a big crowd.”

More morels in meals can be found at the fest’s Wine and Dine Tasting Dinner, which is $45 per person. There are two seatings on Friday night at the Beach House Restaurant at Boyne Mountain Resort.

Each seating features live entertainment and five gourmet hors d’oeuvres that are paired with five fine wines from Bayside Beverage, Baumann said.

MOVING MUSHROOMS

Love the idea of mushrooming, but just not in the woods? Try The Great Morel Giveaway on Saturday, which Baumann said is another popular festival event.

After preregistering at select Boyne City stores, participants then join the 200-strong ‘Morel Mob,’ hitting each store for a special drawing. The winner at each store gets two pounds of morels or a $50 gift certificate.

Those needing even more activity can take part in the Charlevoix Area Humane Society’s 5K Run For Their Lives run, also on Saturday.

Or, mushroom heads can bypass all exercise entirely and head straight for the VFW’s morel breakfast, just before the National Mushroom Hunt’s 7:30am kickoff.

In a nod to the festival’s founding, experienced hunters will gather on Saturday in a 90-minute race to see who can find the most morels.

The fest also features daily carnival rides for the little kids. Bigger “kids” can hit the main tent to enjoy rockers Onager on Friday night and local favorite Audio Circus on Saturday night.

Sunday, the non-profit Northern Michigan Cancer Crusaders take over the tent with live music, an auction and edibles.

FOODIE FUNGI

So why all of this fuss around a fungi, even one that’s become a foodie obsession?

“Morels are a great tasting delicacy,” Baumann said. “They are hard to find and they are only available for a few weeks a year.”

Those eager to try their own recipes can purchase bags of fresh morels for $20 to $60 a pound on the street during the festival.

“They are far more expensive out of season,” said Baumann.

Baumann said the dining events, the morel-hunting seminar, and Friday afternoon’s guided morel hunt are among the most popular events.

Pairing a gourmet rarity with a little friendly competition makes this fest a winwin, Baumann said.

“Creating a festival for a simple mushroom is kind of amazing, when you think about it,” he said. “I have been here for five festivals and have met people from England, Greece, Japan, Peru and Hawaii.

“The morel does draw people.”

Boyne City’s 2014 National Morel Mushroom Festival runs from May 15-18. A full schedule, tickets, and more can be found at bcmorelfestival.com.

Morel Hunting Tips from Jim and Tony

Jim Baumann organizes the morel fest, and Tony Williams gives a seminar on morels every year. Who better to give you insider tips for your morel hunt?

• Don’t look at your feet. Keep your head up and look about 25 feet ahead.

• When you do find a morel, slow down and look around, because they grow in groups.

• If you’re not finding many morels, move along, and cover as much ground as you can.

• Look on the south side of hills early in the season, and on the north side later in the season.

• Keep an eye out for ash trees – morels often grow near them.

 
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