Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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Everything's Shipshape on the Mackinaw

Kristi Kates - May 26th, 2014  

In 1943, Congress ordered a $10 million icebreaker be built to plow through the Great Lakes, keeping the wartime steel industry hopping.

Today, that 290-foot vessel – the Icebreaker Mackinaw WAGB-83 – is now a full-fledged museum, giving visitors a peek into the inner workings of the United States Coast Guard

ALL ABOARD Known as the “Queen of the Great Lakes” during her heyday, the cutter ported in Cheboygan her entire commissioned life. When the ship was taken out of service in 2006, the crew walked off with only personal and perishable items; most everything else was left behind.

With that stage set, the next step was getting the ship museum-ready at its new berth in Mackinaw City, said Lisa Pallagi, the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum’s general manager.

“The ship came to a dock in Mackinaw City that had housed the Chief Wawatam, a railroad car carrier,” Pallagi said. “It did not need the same types of things that we need, so there was quite a bit of conversion work to be done, mostly providing electricity and installing bollards [or nautical posts] for mooring.”

A walking route was then created to take visitors through the museum’s different areas, from operations to housing.


Pallagi’s own favorite spots on the IMMM are the navigation and bridge areas “where the decisions are made on how to operate,” she said.

“But people seem to always be most impressed with the engine room,” she said. “There are three aboard, but they only tour one.”

Two massive locomotive engines supply power for the ship’s diesel/electric system, and are an important part of the ship’s lore.

The engines were named Jake and Elwood by the crew, a reference to both the “Blues Brothers” movies and another character of actor Dan Aykroyd (who played Elwood.)

The engines, Pallagi explained, had their quirks, sometimes acting like the “two wild and crazy guys” that Aykroyd and Steve Martin played in a “Saturday Night Live” TV show sketch.

It’s not surprising that long tours of duty as crew of an icebreaking ship means a lot of DVD watching. There’s a whole infrastructure of day-to-day life that continued even while the ship was out breaking ice, from leisure time to meals.


Back when the ship was operating, food supplies cost more than $25,000 a month.

“The galley is impressive when you see it,” Pallagi said. “Realize that it fed over 100 people three meals a day, plus a ‘mid-rats’ meal for late shifts.”

Visitors see the captain’s and crew’s quarters and can get hands-on with knot-tying and trying on Coast Guard clothing.

To help interpret the ship’s story, docents are stationed onboard to answer questions. The ship also features a new educational station that is slated to open in June.

There is also interactive signage on Coast Guard terminology, all part of the fun-meets-education appeal of the museum.

“Our mission is to tell the story of the ship, and those who sailed aboard her,” Pallagi said.

The staff and volunteers of the IMMM get a few perks, too. During the past two icebreaking seasons, they had the opportunity to sail aboard the Mackinaw WLBB-30, which Pallagi said helped illuminate what life on the ship was like.

“That is when it really hits you,” Pallagi said. “You see just what icebreaking is all about.”

The Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum is located in downtown Mackinaw City between the Municipal Marina and the Straits State Harbor. It is open daily at 9am throughout the summer months. Adult admission is $11; kids $6. The museum will celebrate its 70th anniversary on June 28 with special tours and guest speakers. For more visit themackinaw.org.

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