Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Sweet Summer Sounds at The...
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Sweet Summer Sounds at The Rhubarbary

Kristi Kates - June 2nd, 2014  


Talk about up close and personal. By hosting public concerts in their home, The Rhubarbary, musicians Dale and Maureen Scott give music fans a uniquely intimate way to appreciate summertime music.

WARM WELCOME

The Rhubarbary seats 60 and features big windows and vista views of the Scott’s gardens, as well as resident chickens and a small flock of sheep.

After putting a timber frame addition onto their house several years ago, the Scotts wondered what they were going to do with the extra space. Already known around the area as musicians in their own right – they’re the Peacemeal String Band – the answer arrived quickly.

“We realized it would be a perfect place for people to gather and listen to music, and for traveling musicians to show their talents and make a little money,” Dale Scott said.

The open room, built entirely of wood, generates a warm sound. The Scotts encourage concert goers to bring beverages and things along to eat. During intermission, people can walk through the gardens, where Iris, the Australian shepherd dog, serves as the unofficial mascot.

IN THE HOUSE

One of the most unique parts of The Rhubarbary, Scott said, is “the up-close aspect.”

Rhubarbary shows, while professionally run, are like being invited over to a friend’s house, and that friend just happens to know some acclaimed musicians, who just happen to be over playing a little music.

Concerts as intimate as these create special moments, Dale Scott said.

“The social halftime is always special and difficult to close down. People bring an hors d’oeuvre to pass at the intermission, which is very nice,” he said. “There is no other Rhubarbary.”

SOULFUL SEASON

The Rhubarbary’s season kicked off last month with 40-year folk-jazz veteran Claudia Schmidt. The second show, Drive South, featured songwriter/guitarist Roger Brown and singer Mary Sue Wilkinson; the duo’s harmonies are the most impressive part of their performance.

Emmylou Harris soundalike Rita Hosking will be taking The Rhubarbary stage in June; she plays eclectic country-Americana music and will be joined by Sean Feder on dobro and banjo.

“I can promise she will be great,” Dale Scott said. “She’s not quite old-time, not quite bluegrass, but a ‘soulful howl from the mountains.’” Scott says a big highlight is the duo of Carmen Maret and Andrew Bergeron, a tango-jazz-world music hybrid on flute and guitar, who have four critically acclaimed albums under their belts.

“I can’t wait to have them here,” he said.

HUG A MUSICIAN

The artists seem to enjoy The Rhubarbary as much as the audiences do. Instead of being put up in a sterile hotel, they’re often housed on site, and are treated to a homecooked dinner by Maureen Scott before their performance.

It continues to be a rewarding venture for both Scotts, who find their efforts more than worthwhile.

“Often, the artists are friends of ours, and this is a chance to catch up on their lives, and vice-versa,” he said.

It’s an arrangement that works equally well for music fans.

“There is no curtain or backstage for the artists to slip in and out of,” he said, “so if you want to ask a question or hug a musician, you just do.”

For more information on The Rhubarbary Concerts series, visit peacemealstringband. com or telephone the venue at (231) 357- 7339. All shows take place at the Scott’s Rhubarbary Farm in Harbor Springs.

 
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