Letters

Letters 04-25-2016

Taking Our Trees Seconds ago this pine tree was alive. Well, Mr. Cook — our County Road Commission head —and Peninsula Township government … by not weighing in (I guess it’s not your problem or responsibility to communicate with residents), you allowed the County Road Commission to bulldoze down huge swaths of lakeside trees in order to increase the bike lane. This can’t be happening. I have no clue why they would cut trees down that help block snow from creating drifts on Peninsula Drive and help keep the beach area intact. Plus, they are not increasing the width of the road when they repave. I just don’t get it. This is amateur hour at county and township government...

Government Service Unrewarded I served the federal government for XX years with the [agency], [doing XX]. I also worked in the private sector, [doing XX]. When I retired, I was surprised to learn my Social Security benefit would be $XXX less per month than my colleagues and neighbors who had never worked for the federal government. This is all because of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) under the Social Security law...

Which Greased Palm Now that “Chicago values” have utterly corrupted the executive and judicial branches of our federal government, this November We the Plebeians shall either vote to right the governing integrity of the United States constitution’s twin pillars of limited government and separation of powers or turn and step collectively onto the blood soaked road to serfdom...

The Political Mess And Challenge As citizens we are faced with a real challenge. The media and the political candidates have taken over a year to attack those whom they are opposing. The unfavorable ratings of those who may be nominated are above 50 percent. That should be no surprise, considering the length of time given to bloodying one another with opinions that have little relationship to truth. The polling companies, which confess they are not reliable, make everything a game of winning...

CORRECTIONS In last week’s issue we had photos with the incorrect stories on page five. The dance photo should have accompanied the story about grants to nonprofits. The image of Crooked Tree Arts Center Petoskey should have accompanied the story about the ArtPrize exhibit at CTAC.

We also reported the incorrect day for the Bayshore Marathon in Traverse City. The correct date is Sat., May 28.

We apologize for these errors.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Sweet Summer Sounds at The...
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Sweet Summer Sounds at The Rhubarbary

Kristi Kates - June 2nd, 2014  


Talk about up close and personal. By hosting public concerts in their home, The Rhubarbary, musicians Dale and Maureen Scott give music fans a uniquely intimate way to appreciate summertime music.

WARM WELCOME

The Rhubarbary seats 60 and features big windows and vista views of the Scott’s gardens, as well as resident chickens and a small flock of sheep.

After putting a timber frame addition onto their house several years ago, the Scotts wondered what they were going to do with the extra space. Already known around the area as musicians in their own right – they’re the Peacemeal String Band – the answer arrived quickly.

“We realized it would be a perfect place for people to gather and listen to music, and for traveling musicians to show their talents and make a little money,” Dale Scott said.

The open room, built entirely of wood, generates a warm sound. The Scotts encourage concert goers to bring beverages and things along to eat. During intermission, people can walk through the gardens, where Iris, the Australian shepherd dog, serves as the unofficial mascot.

IN THE HOUSE

One of the most unique parts of The Rhubarbary, Scott said, is “the up-close aspect.”

Rhubarbary shows, while professionally run, are like being invited over to a friend’s house, and that friend just happens to know some acclaimed musicians, who just happen to be over playing a little music.

Concerts as intimate as these create special moments, Dale Scott said.

“The social halftime is always special and difficult to close down. People bring an hors d’oeuvre to pass at the intermission, which is very nice,” he said. “There is no other Rhubarbary.”

SOULFUL SEASON

The Rhubarbary’s season kicked off last month with 40-year folk-jazz veteran Claudia Schmidt. The second show, Drive South, featured songwriter/guitarist Roger Brown and singer Mary Sue Wilkinson; the duo’s harmonies are the most impressive part of their performance.

Emmylou Harris soundalike Rita Hosking will be taking The Rhubarbary stage in June; she plays eclectic country-Americana music and will be joined by Sean Feder on dobro and banjo.

“I can promise she will be great,” Dale Scott said. “She’s not quite old-time, not quite bluegrass, but a ‘soulful howl from the mountains.’” Scott says a big highlight is the duo of Carmen Maret and Andrew Bergeron, a tango-jazz-world music hybrid on flute and guitar, who have four critically acclaimed albums under their belts.

“I can’t wait to have them here,” he said.

HUG A MUSICIAN

The artists seem to enjoy The Rhubarbary as much as the audiences do. Instead of being put up in a sterile hotel, they’re often housed on site, and are treated to a homecooked dinner by Maureen Scott before their performance.

It continues to be a rewarding venture for both Scotts, who find their efforts more than worthwhile.

“Often, the artists are friends of ours, and this is a chance to catch up on their lives, and vice-versa,” he said.

It’s an arrangement that works equally well for music fans.

“There is no curtain or backstage for the artists to slip in and out of,” he said, “so if you want to ask a question or hug a musician, you just do.”

For more information on The Rhubarbary Concerts series, visit peacemealstringband. com or telephone the venue at (231) 357- 7339. All shows take place at the Scott’s Rhubarbary Farm in Harbor Springs.

 
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