Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Sweet Summer Sounds at The...
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Sweet Summer Sounds at The Rhubarbary

Kristi Kates - June 2nd, 2014  


Talk about up close and personal. By hosting public concerts in their home, The Rhubarbary, musicians Dale and Maureen Scott give music fans a uniquely intimate way to appreciate summertime music.

WARM WELCOME

The Rhubarbary seats 60 and features big windows and vista views of the Scott’s gardens, as well as resident chickens and a small flock of sheep.

After putting a timber frame addition onto their house several years ago, the Scotts wondered what they were going to do with the extra space. Already known around the area as musicians in their own right – they’re the Peacemeal String Band – the answer arrived quickly.

“We realized it would be a perfect place for people to gather and listen to music, and for traveling musicians to show their talents and make a little money,” Dale Scott said.

The open room, built entirely of wood, generates a warm sound. The Scotts encourage concert goers to bring beverages and things along to eat. During intermission, people can walk through the gardens, where Iris, the Australian shepherd dog, serves as the unofficial mascot.

IN THE HOUSE

One of the most unique parts of The Rhubarbary, Scott said, is “the up-close aspect.”

Rhubarbary shows, while professionally run, are like being invited over to a friend’s house, and that friend just happens to know some acclaimed musicians, who just happen to be over playing a little music.

Concerts as intimate as these create special moments, Dale Scott said.

“The social halftime is always special and difficult to close down. People bring an hors d’oeuvre to pass at the intermission, which is very nice,” he said. “There is no other Rhubarbary.”

SOULFUL SEASON

The Rhubarbary’s season kicked off last month with 40-year folk-jazz veteran Claudia Schmidt. The second show, Drive South, featured songwriter/guitarist Roger Brown and singer Mary Sue Wilkinson; the duo’s harmonies are the most impressive part of their performance.

Emmylou Harris soundalike Rita Hosking will be taking The Rhubarbary stage in June; she plays eclectic country-Americana music and will be joined by Sean Feder on dobro and banjo.

“I can promise she will be great,” Dale Scott said. “She’s not quite old-time, not quite bluegrass, but a ‘soulful howl from the mountains.’” Scott says a big highlight is the duo of Carmen Maret and Andrew Bergeron, a tango-jazz-world music hybrid on flute and guitar, who have four critically acclaimed albums under their belts.

“I can’t wait to have them here,” he said.

HUG A MUSICIAN

The artists seem to enjoy The Rhubarbary as much as the audiences do. Instead of being put up in a sterile hotel, they’re often housed on site, and are treated to a homecooked dinner by Maureen Scott before their performance.

It continues to be a rewarding venture for both Scotts, who find their efforts more than worthwhile.

“Often, the artists are friends of ours, and this is a chance to catch up on their lives, and vice-versa,” he said.

It’s an arrangement that works equally well for music fans.

“There is no curtain or backstage for the artists to slip in and out of,” he said, “so if you want to ask a question or hug a musician, you just do.”

For more information on The Rhubarbary Concerts series, visit peacemealstringband. com or telephone the venue at (231) 357- 7339. All shows take place at the Scott’s Rhubarbary Farm in Harbor Springs.

 
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