Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Folk, Celtic and More at Manitou
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Folk, Celtic and More at Manitou

Ross Boissoneau - June 2nd, 2014  

The Manitou Music Festival might be one of the region’s best-kept secrets. Its musical smorgasbord brings together folk, blues, traditional favorites, and Celtic music all over Glen Arbor.

This year’s festival includes familiar fare like Trina Hamilton and Mulebone, local favorites the Northport Community Band and Billy Strings & Don Julin, and Irish bands Girsa and Full Set, among others.

“It’s kind of a casual thing,” said Jack Conners, who took over the festival last year. A veteran musical engineer and musician, Conners also is on staff at Interlochen Public Radio and Northwestern Michigan College.

“People can walk in knowing there’s going to be something [nearly] every Sunday and Wednesday,” he said. “It’s nice to have a $15 ticket, and 18 and under are free. It encourages people to bring their kids out.”

Conners says securing the artists depends on who is touring and available. He works with local promoter/agent Seamus Shinners to book the acts. If the talent is a good fit musically and financially, they book it.

“That’s where Seamus comes in,” Conners said. “He knows the performers and who’s touring. We have to find someone at a reasonable cost.”

The rootsy acoustic blues of Mulebone, which is Hugh Pool on guitar and vocals and John Ragusa on flutes, whistles, cornet, and vocals, always draws a crowd. The duo has been a mainstay of the festival for the past several years.

Pool says the audience’s appreciation of the group goes both ways.

“We’ve been treated really well,” he said. “There’s great energy. There have been no bad gigs.”

What started out as a single show several years ago has become a series of concerts across the region and across the state.

Pool gives credit to Shinners and the Manitou Music Festival.

“Two shows became three became five became nine. Now it’s two weeks, 12 shows in Michigan,” Pool said. “We just jumped on the Seamus bandwagon.”

Pool said he values the long-term relationship he’s had with the festival.

“It’s not that often you can go back year after year,” he said. “Manitou has become the end of our Michigan tour. Who wouldn’t want to go there?”

THE COMPLETE 2014 SCHEDULE:

Northport Community Band 7pm July 3, the old school house, Glen Arbor (free)

The Moxie Strings and percussionist Fritz Mc- Girr, 7pm July 13, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore Dune Climb on M-109 (free)

Mulebone, 8pm July 20, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

Guitarist Ronald Radford, 7pm July 24, the Homestead Resort, Glen Arbor

The Wilenes, 8pm July 27, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

Full Set, 8pm July 30, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

Billy Strings & Don Julin, 8pm Aug. 3, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

Girsa, 8pm Aug. 6, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

Peter, Paul and Mary Remembered, 8pm Aug. 10, Studio Stage at Lake Street Studio, Glen Arbor

The Summer Singers, 7pm Aug. 12, Glen Lake Community Church (free)

Trina Hamlin & Annie Gallup, 8pm Aug. 13, The Leelanau School, Glen Arbor

For tickets, rain locations and additional details, visit glenarborart.org and click on “Manitou Music Festival.”

MANITOU MUSIC FESTIVAL A Brief History

The Manitou Music Festival actually began under another name and a different genre altogether.

Music Around the Lakes was the brainchild of Crispin Campbell of Interlochen and the late Richard Luby of North Carolina. The two classical musicians started a chamber music series more than 20 years ago in various churches and town halls.

As it morphed over the years, it took on a new name and broadened its appeal.

From 2007 to 2013, Harry Fried helmed the series, now renamed the Manitou Music Festival, building on the tradition and incorporating new styles into the mix. He also oversaw improvements in the stage area behind Lake Street Studios, upgrades in sound and lighting, and a new stage monitoring system.

After Fried retired last year, Jack Conners took over. A veteran musical engineer and musician, Conners also is on staff at Interlochen Public Radio and Northwestern Michigan College.

Conners said the mix of genres, the carefree summer attitude of the audiences, and the relative affordability of the shows makes for a formula that “works.”

“The festival has developed a formula that works over the years,” he said.

 
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