Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dancers celebrate 20 years
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Dancers celebrate 20 years

For Pascal Rioult, the founder and choreographer of RIOULT Dance NY, the troupe’s 20th anniversary is no time to rest on its laurels.

Ross Boissoneau - June 16th, 2014  

“We’re preparing for our New York season right now,” Rioult said during a break in rehearsals.

Rioult founded the group in 1994; today it is recognized as one of the leading dance troupes in the nation, touring worldwide and presenting an annual New York season.

Interlochen hosts RIOULT Dance NY for a performance at Corson Auditorium June 26. The program will include “Views of the Fleeting World” (2008) and portions of Rioult’s Ravel Project. “Wien” dates from 1995, and “Bolero” from 2002.

“It’s music I love,” said Rioult of his fellow Frenchman Maurice Ravel.

Ravel’s most famous piece, “Bolero,” was originally composed for ballet. It consists of a repetitive riff or melodic line that gradually incorporates the entire orchestra. In the dance, Rioult sought to mirror the slowly building theme in the same way for the dancers.

Ravel began composing “Wien” (Vienna) in 1906 as a tribute to the music of Johann Strauss Jr. and the concept of the fantastic whirl of destiny. It morphed over time into “La Valse” and wasn’t finished until 1920. By that time, Vienna was in the midst of famine and epidemic in the wake of World War I, so the concept of destiny had taken on a bitter tone.

Rioult kept the waltz, but interrupts the smooth progress of the traditional circling movements with incongruous, at times violent movements. Thus the Viennese waltz, the very image of social refinement, becomes the symbol of a disintegrating society taken into a whirlpool of violence and humiliation.

“It’s like dancing on a volcano,” said Rioult. “It’s twisted until it tumbles apart. It’s a maelstrom of violence and release.”

A former star athlete in France, Rioult turned to dance and came to the United States on a fellowship from the French Ministry of Culture to study modern dance in 1981. After performing with the companies of May O’Donnell and Paul Sanasardo he was invited to join the Martha Graham Dance Company.

As a principal dancer with Graham, he interpreted many of the most prestigious roles in the repertory. In 1990, Graham created the central role of Death Figure in her ballet Eye of the Goddess for him.

Rioult formed his own company four years later to create his own dances, among them “Martha, May and Me,” in which he pays homage to his mentors O’Donnell and Graham.

Asked whether the dances or the music come first, Rioult said, “It depends. They come from the (existing) music, or I have the dance moves in my head, and from the dance images comes the music.”

Rioult said he likes to challenge himself by imposing arbitrary rules. “I try to give myself a challenge choreographically. The music of ‘Wien’ sounds like a whirlpool, so the dance is a circle.”

Rioult has found inspiration in nature, in Japanese wood blocks, in the music of Bach – sometimes all of this and more.

For “Views of the Fleeting World,” Rioult chose Bach’s “The Art of the Fugue,” melding Bach’s Germanic music with Asian motifs.

“Somehow, his extraordinary German mind went with Asian philosophy, Bach and the Japanese print,” Rioult added. “I don’t know exactly why.”

“As an artist, you work first on instinct. Eventually you find out why (you made certain choices). That’s the most exciting part of my job – the ‘Ah hah!’ moment.

RIOULT Dance NY includes ten dancers plus two apprentices (and unlike most touring dance troupes, RIOULT members are fulltime employees with benefits).

“My dancers are all there for me. They are hired and work all year together. It’s 36 to 39 weeks, six hours a day, five days a week,” he said.

Rioult is especially excited about a visit to Interlochen, where troupe member dancer Holt Walborn studied.

“We’ve wanted to be at Interlochen. It will be a great program.”

For tickets and more information, go to Interlochen.tickets.org.

 
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