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Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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Interlochen Shakespeare Festival focuses on magic and romance

Ross Boissoneau - June 16th, 2014  

“We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.” So says Prospero in William Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

The idea of a Shakespeare Festival at Interlochen once was but a dream. This year’s presentation of The Tempest marks the seventh year for the festival.

“We said, ‘Let’s try this and see if it works.’ It did work. We’ve been able to keep it going and grow,” says Laura Middlestaedt, who is directing The Tempest.

Middlestaedt has been part of the festival since its inception. She’s previously acted and worked alongside Bill Church, who directed the previous six plays at the festival.

Now the tables are turned, as Church will be bringing Prospero to life under Middlestaedt’s direction.

“He was ready to hand off the keys to someone else,” she says.

The Tempest is set on a remote island, where Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her lawful place. Prospero’s brother Antonio, conspiring with Alonso, the King of Naples, usurped his position.

Prospero and Miranda were left to die on a raft at sea, but they made their way to the island, where they have lived for 12 years. When his enemies pass nearby, Prospero uses his magical powers to call up the title storm in order to exact his revenge upon his enemies. His machinations bring about the revelation of Antonio’s true nature, the redemption of the King, and the marriage of Miranda to Alonso’s son, Ferdinand.

The Tempest incorporates romance, peril, comedy, abduction, revenge, action, and magic.

Middlestaedt says the play uses all those elements to define the characters, their motivations and how they interact. “It tends to peel back the layers of people,” she says. “It’s often called a romance but it’s hard to categorize.”

She says the play is a contrast to last season’s production of Hamlet. The tale of the doomed Danish prince is a tragedy in which practically everyone dies. The Tempest is much lighter in tone, though it still has its dark moments.

“It’s a lighter play but it strikes a balance. It has characters who are complex,” she says.

Middlestaedt was excited about the opportunity to direct the play. She played Prospero’s magical aide Ariel in a production of The Tempest ten years ago and says the play remains one of her favorites.

“When you are first introduced to a play it makes a big impression,” she says. “It’s a play that stuck with me.”

Middlestaedt says she’s also thrilled to work with set designer Edward Morris, who has been designing for plays in New York City. He’s also an Interlochen alum.

Tom Childs, a current faculty member at Interlochen, is composing original music for the play. “There are songs in the play, and I asked Tom to create some more for it,” she says.

“What’s past is prologue.” Antonio’s plea to his friend Sebastian is meant to suggest that all that has happened to this point has set the stage for Antonio and Sebastian to make their own destinies.

Much the same is true of the Shakespeare Festival. Middlestaedt believes its success over the past six years has set it up for further growth.

“We’ll truly be a festival when we have more than one play going,” says Middlestaedt. “In the future we’ll have others going, which will offer comprehensive experience for alumni and educational opportunities for students.”

Middlestaedt says being able to stage the play outside is another step toward creating a true festival.

“Before it was in the Harvey Theatre. We kept selling out. Now we’re in a large outdoor facility, and can accommodate more people,” she says.

“Being outdoors gives it more potential for growth.”

The Tempest runs June 26-July 5. For tickets and performance times, go to Interlochen.org.

 
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