Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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Brews, Dogs, and Two-Steppin’ on the Shores of Torch

Dancing on Torch Lake’s shoreline with a Shorts beer and Coney Island dog in hand is certainly one way to have a perfect Northern Michigan day.

Kristi Kates - June 23rd, 2014  

It’s the kind of day dreamed up by the Grass River Natural Area’s new executive director as a fundraiser for the nonprofit preserve and its operating expenses.

IMMEDIATE NEEDS

Haley Breniser, an MSU grad and Michigan native, took the helm at Grass River last fall.

A mosaic of habitats that lie within the GRNA’s 1,443 acres: Deciduous and mixed forest, upland meadow, cedar swamp, and riverine habitat are all represented.

“The plant and animal species associated with this mosaic play an important role in the integrity of the greater Grand Traverse Bay Watershed,” Breniser said.

In order to keep that special aura, the area’s $200,000 annual budget needed a boost to help pay for “immediate needs” like a new trail and interpretive signage, plus equipment for the preserve’s stewardship practices, like water quality testing, invasive species control, and trail maintenance.

“The GRNA really needs support from both individuals and foundations in order to function at our full potential,” she said.

And that’s where the dance on the shores of Torch Lake comes in.

DANCING SHOES

The concert fundraiser is one of the highlights of GRNA’s summer.

Officially called The Annual Grass River Natural Area Benefit Dance, the event will take place at the Alden Depot Park.

Five-piece Lansing band Steppin’ In It will provide what Breniser called “an awesome mix” of blues, bluegrass, funk, zydeco, and jazz.

“I remember seeing them in concert while going to school,” she said. “They have incredible talent and energy.”

The Up North Brass Quintet will serve as opening act. Coney Island style hotdogs and beverages from Short’s Brewery will also be available.

Just make sure you don’t forget your dancing shoes.

“Events like this give me the opportunity to get to know the people who have made the preserve what it is today,” Breniser said. “This is a very fun way to support the GRNA.”

The GRNA holds other fundraising events throughout the year, too. The Flower Fundraiser, Spring Fling Dinner, and the thoughtful Tribute Stone Fund are the most popular, the latter giving people the opportunity to donate an engraved garden path stone in memory of someone special.

SPECIAL HABITATS

Seven miles of trails in all, including boardwalks, are available to those who want to explore the GRNA’s lands. And a new education center was built in 2011 to help educate visitors about the natural world.

It’s all part of the GRNA’s ultimate goal: to protect those 1,443 acres through land management and education.

“We are essentially guarding an important place for the ecological health of our community,” Breniser said.

The Annual Grass River Natural Area Benefit Dance will take place June 28. Tickets are $15 in advance/$18 at the door, available online at grassriver.org. You can also donate to the preserve any time on their website, or by mailing a donation to their office at Grass River Natural Area, Inc., P.O. Box 231, Bellaire, MI, 49615.

 
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