Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

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Letters 06-23-2014

- June 23rd, 2014  
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The Cooing of Pigeons

My wife’s elderly cousin had moved into a nice care home to spend his final days. When I went to visit him, there was no television, and I asked him why. “Don’t want one. It stresses me out”. Every time we visited him, his door was open and he was out an about with his walker visiting people instead of watching the tube.

After he was gone, I decided to see what it would be like to go without a television, even for and evening. I went into our bedroom after supper, and just lay down to listen to the sounds going on around me in our house. It was amazing!

My son had spent the afternoon fixing me his special clam chowder, which was a nice gift with tomorrow being father’s day. After supper, my wife cleared the table and I could hear the swish-swish-swish of the dishwasher.

I looked around me on the bed, and there were the three cats and the dog spending time with me. Maybe they were there because I wasn’t trying to change them into something they weren’t. I do that to my wife, from time to time.

She and my son then sat down in the living room and I could hear them talking about nothing in particular. The sound of their voices was familiar and pleasant. It reminded me of the cooing of pigeons. I felt connected to my family in a way that had long ago been lost.

We do ourselves no favors by constantly filling our lives with the white noise of television. Take some time to turn off the tube, and just listen to the love that surrounds you in your home.

William E. Scott, Traverse City

My Peace Corps

I have a different perspective from Frederik Stig-Nielsen on serving in the Peace Corps. I volunteered in Niger, West Africa from 1980- 83 and count it among life’s richest experiences.

People join the Peace Corps for different reasons: to travel, share skills, gain new skills, etc. I joined to continue my education, live in an African village, speak foreign languages, and serve a rural community. I handed out medicine, shared household goods, and treated infant malnutrition. There were lots of ways to serve, once I let go of my preconceptions and learned about my community.

The author questions the Peace Corps’ underlying motives because volunteers are not able to affect change. In my experience, there was plenty of change: in me. I developed cultural understanding and an ability to deal with ambiguity and complexity. Early on, I worked with a young mother that had weaned her baby abruptly, leading to his severe malnutrition; we developed a peanutrich “broth” to ease his transition to hard food. Small acts have an impact.

Not all volunteers have a good experience. Some have ill defined assignments, lack necessary resources or support from supervisors. Sometimes Peace Corps can reassign a volunteer but mostly volunteers are left to fend for themselves—this is an issue that needs to change. The organization is not perfect; but pressure from current and former volunteers has lead to some necessary reforms.

My advice to prospective volunteers: leave your preconceptions on the airplane, get your inoculations, and prepare to be amazed. But prepare to be frustrated.

The organization’s motto is “the toughest job you’ll ever love.” While not true for all, it can be a positive, life changing experience. Many returned volunteers continue to work or volunteer throughout their lives. In my book, that’s value for money.

Ann McPhail, Williamsburg

Applauding Tolerance

I loved the front cover of the May 14 paper. Of course, I am a little partial as the man on the right is my son Andy, with his partner Joel. Your article was eye-opening, chilling, and reassuring... quite a combination considering the content. The lack of tolerance of homosexuality in the 21st Century is appalling, even though we have made great strides in accepting that gays are an integral part of our lives.

Thank you for helping to dispel some of the illusions.

Charlotte Betka, Ludington, MI

Emergency Shelter Fulfilling 2006 Plan

As the Grand Traverse community has been discussing the issues of emergency shelter and homelessness these last few months, a document has surfaced from 2006 that spells out some of the challenges we face. If you wonder how we got to where we are today, all you need to do is read this study. It’s all laid out here, and it is as true today as it was then.

What went wrong? In a nutshell: planning failed. At some point in the last eight years, our leadership, developers, the economy failed to create affordable housing. Now we have a plan for ending homelessness, but nowhere for those on the street to go. This is due (in part) to the lack of housing.

Given the national economy, the banking crisis, and Michigan’s economy, the incentive to build affordable housing hasn’t been there. If you recall, the City of Traverse City has been trying to find a partner to develop the depot property for years, and it is finally underway.

If affordable housing here doesn’t materialize, we better be ready for a swelling of the homeless. Our leaders must make affordable housing as easy for developers to build as possible until the imbalance we are experiencing is leveled out.

This isn’t simply a City of Traverse City issue; it should be a regional concern. Zoning plans need to identify areas for affordable housing development. Funding and leadership to create these new homes must be encouraged.

As the subject of emergency shelter is fiercely discussed at the city (where shelters should be located) Street Advocate hopes that regional leaders will get serious about affordable housing. Our city isn’t the only government that is responsible; the 2006 report discovered this eight years ago.

Peter Starkel, Traverse City (Street Advocate of Grand Traverse)

 
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