Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Tiny Town - An Artists’ Mecca
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Tiny Town - An Artists’ Mecca

Tucked in tiny Cross Village is a gem of an arts studio where color and imagination reign supreme.

Ross & Cathy Boissoneau - July 1st, 2014  


Three Pines Studio is Gene Reck and Joann Condino’s baby. Founded 14 years ago, the studio features works from more than 40 Emmet County artists, along with others from north of the 45th parallel.

In the airy, cedar shake structure, watercolors and oils, pottery and photography abound, as well as decorative lighting and other home accessories.

Hand dyed and/or painted scarves and vests, indigo batik and silk shiborim – all created by Condino – are colorful punctuations in the gallery, where creativity and stories all have their place.

Condino and Reck met while both were working at Wayne State University. Reck, a retired scientist turned potter, works in ceramics used for growing plants and cut flowers, as well as hand-formed functional pottery.

For her part, Condino is at home in the world of fibers, dyeing and painting functional and wearable art.

Constantly in motion in the gallery, she is passionate about her work and her studio.

“I’m Italian, and my father gave me crate tops. I’d paint on the tops,” she said.

While Three Pines displays a variety of artists and media, it is more than a gallery. It is a working studio, and not just for its two owners. It offers a number of work shops, in such media as plein air pastels, papermaking, quillwork, and jewelry.

Fabric arts workshops include open studio woodblock sessions, which are held every Wednesday in July and August. These offer insights and instruction on how to use a wide variety of woodblocks and textile paints on cotton. On Mondays and Tuesdays, the studio offers instruction for Shibori-Indigo and Batik-Indigo during dropin studio time.

Cultivating kids into artists is also a passion for Three Pines: Thursdays, there are kids workshops in painting, sculpture, collage, and jewelry. Some July and August Fridays will find the studio enchanted with fairy fun.

“It’s the excitement of constantly doing and making,” said Condino.

The “doing and making” is primarily local, with all artists from north of the 45th parallel save for one who moved to Grand Rapids, Condino said.

Artists with works on display include Harry Boyer of Harbor Springs and Lynn Dinning of Good Hart. Their colorful blown glass decorations are among the many highlights at the gallery, which also includes a fall glass pumpkin patch that visitors line up for, Condino said.

One of the more striking visual displays, however, is Three Pines’ yarn display, the result of the studio’s The Colors of Crooked Tree Yarn project.

Begun eight years ago to support a sustainable farm-to-market enterprise in Cross Village, Three Pines hand paints its own yarn, which is sourced from English Leicester longwool sheep raised at nearby Lake View Farm and spun at Stonehedge Fiber Mill in East Jordan.

In addition to the studio display, Condino’s artisan yarns may be purchased at the Harbor Springs Market every Wednesday and Saturday from June-October.

This year’s yarn colors include what Condino has dubbed the Coffee House Collection, with latte, cappuccino multi, chai and green tea colors. The Spice collection includes cayenne, cumin and paprika; the Lake Collection with blues and sunset colors; and Spice Carnation, the studio’s version of Radiant Orchid, the Pantone color of the year. Fine arts weaver Jerry Ripley uses the studio’s yarns to create his works of art.

Beyond beauty, art is also about surprise.

One might not expect to find such a voluminous array of artwork in the tiny town of Cross Village…but lucky for us, it’s there.

Three Pines Studio is located at 5959 W. Levering Road in Cross Village. Phone (231) 526-9447, or visit threepinesstudio. com or its Facebook page for more information on workshops.

 
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