Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Tiny Town - An Artists’ Mecca
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Tiny Town - An Artists’ Mecca

Tucked in tiny Cross Village is a gem of an arts studio where color and imagination reign supreme.

Ross & Cathy Boissoneau - July 1st, 2014  


Three Pines Studio is Gene Reck and Joann Condino’s baby. Founded 14 years ago, the studio features works from more than 40 Emmet County artists, along with others from north of the 45th parallel.

In the airy, cedar shake structure, watercolors and oils, pottery and photography abound, as well as decorative lighting and other home accessories.

Hand dyed and/or painted scarves and vests, indigo batik and silk shiborim – all created by Condino – are colorful punctuations in the gallery, where creativity and stories all have their place.

Condino and Reck met while both were working at Wayne State University. Reck, a retired scientist turned potter, works in ceramics used for growing plants and cut flowers, as well as hand-formed functional pottery.

For her part, Condino is at home in the world of fibers, dyeing and painting functional and wearable art.

Constantly in motion in the gallery, she is passionate about her work and her studio.

“I’m Italian, and my father gave me crate tops. I’d paint on the tops,” she said.

While Three Pines displays a variety of artists and media, it is more than a gallery. It is a working studio, and not just for its two owners. It offers a number of work shops, in such media as plein air pastels, papermaking, quillwork, and jewelry.

Fabric arts workshops include open studio woodblock sessions, which are held every Wednesday in July and August. These offer insights and instruction on how to use a wide variety of woodblocks and textile paints on cotton. On Mondays and Tuesdays, the studio offers instruction for Shibori-Indigo and Batik-Indigo during dropin studio time.

Cultivating kids into artists is also a passion for Three Pines: Thursdays, there are kids workshops in painting, sculpture, collage, and jewelry. Some July and August Fridays will find the studio enchanted with fairy fun.

“It’s the excitement of constantly doing and making,” said Condino.

The “doing and making” is primarily local, with all artists from north of the 45th parallel save for one who moved to Grand Rapids, Condino said.

Artists with works on display include Harry Boyer of Harbor Springs and Lynn Dinning of Good Hart. Their colorful blown glass decorations are among the many highlights at the gallery, which also includes a fall glass pumpkin patch that visitors line up for, Condino said.

One of the more striking visual displays, however, is Three Pines’ yarn display, the result of the studio’s The Colors of Crooked Tree Yarn project.

Begun eight years ago to support a sustainable farm-to-market enterprise in Cross Village, Three Pines hand paints its own yarn, which is sourced from English Leicester longwool sheep raised at nearby Lake View Farm and spun at Stonehedge Fiber Mill in East Jordan.

In addition to the studio display, Condino’s artisan yarns may be purchased at the Harbor Springs Market every Wednesday and Saturday from June-October.

This year’s yarn colors include what Condino has dubbed the Coffee House Collection, with latte, cappuccino multi, chai and green tea colors. The Spice collection includes cayenne, cumin and paprika; the Lake Collection with blues and sunset colors; and Spice Carnation, the studio’s version of Radiant Orchid, the Pantone color of the year. Fine arts weaver Jerry Ripley uses the studio’s yarns to create his works of art.

Beyond beauty, art is also about surprise.

One might not expect to find such a voluminous array of artwork in the tiny town of Cross Village…but lucky for us, it’s there.

Three Pines Studio is located at 5959 W. Levering Road in Cross Village. Phone (231) 526-9447, or visit threepinesstudio. com or its Facebook page for more information on workshops.

 
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