Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Growers Cheery About Cherry...
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Growers Cheery About Cherry Crop

Jodee Taylor - July 7th, 2014  

Cautiously optimistic, cherry growers and their crops have emerged from months of harsh weather none the worse for wear.

The cherries – expected late July – “came out of dormancy really slow,” meaning less risk of frost damage, said Nikki Rothwell, coordinator at the Northwest Michigan Horticulture Research Center.

“We always say, ‘Oh, it’s a normal year,’ but I don’t know if we know what normal is anymore,” Rothwell said.

She thinks this year’s tart cherry crop will be about 75 percent of the 2013 harvest, which was close to 218 million pounds, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

Growers won’t know how much cherries will sell for until they actually drop them off at a processing plant.

Sweet cherries will have a really good crop, Rothwell said. There are basically four types of sweet cherries grown in the region – Emperor Francis, Ulster, a new variety called Regina and Attika. Emperor Francis is the most popular because it’s used mainly for maraschino cherries.

The only problem that could possibly happen to the sweets at this point is cracking, Rothwell said. If there’s too much rain around harvest, the cherries can split.

Michigan grows 75 percent of the nation’s tart cherries, and this crop, though slightly behind schedule, is expected to be good as well.

Montmorency cherries dominate the local tart market, although some Balafons are grown here.

There are about 32,000 acres of tart cherries being grown in Michigan and about 8,000 acres of sweets. The amount has stayed steady, Rothwell said, even though some orchards on the Old Mission Peninsula have been replaced by vineyards.

She said southwest Lower Michigan has been planting more cherry trees, which helps.

And, while the cherry crop did fine over the nasty winter, some apple trees didn’t survive.

“I always think of apples as being winterhardy,” Rothwell said. “They don’t look very good, but it’s not like it’s wiped out.”

‘RUBY RED GEMS’

One little cherry packs a big nutritional punch.

“I call them ‘ruby red gems,’” said Wendy Bazilian, a registered dietitian with the Cherry Marketing Institute. Tart cherries are full of potassium, vitamin A, vitamin C and fiber.

Better yet, they don’t have fat, cholesterol and they’re low in sodium, she said.

“Tart cherries are one of the few foods that has melatonin naturally,” she said. Melatonin won’t make you sleepy, but does help keep you asleep.

“There are less waking hours over the course of the night,” Bazilian said.

The Vitamin A, of which tart cherries have 19 times more than blueberries or strawberries, is especially good for eyes, skin and the immune system.

And recent research points toward tart cherries – whether dried, frozen, fresh or in juice – as a great tool for “precovery.”

Athletes getting ready for a marathon or a long bike ride, for instance, drink cherry juice a week before, the day of and the day after the event and have decreased soreness, Bazilian said.

She recommends eating or drinking “reasonable amounts” of cherries: a half-cup of juice, a quarter-cup dried cherries, or a cup of cherries.

“Mother Nature does a good job of giving us the nutrients we need in regular amounts of food,” she said.

And tart cherries have anthocyanins, a property that gives them their bright red color, but also may have health benefits as an antioxidant.

Bazilian recommends checking with a health professional or registered dietitian before using any supplements to take care of a medical condition, like gout or high cholesterol, even though research has shown that tart cherries can help in numerous ways, in any form.

And don’t forget good old sweet cherries. “There’s not as much research” on those, Bazilian said, but there’s a “definite overlap” in the nutritional benefits.

“They’re all in the family,” she said.


 
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