Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · They've Got the Beat
. . . .

They've Got the Beat

Kristi Kates - July 7th, 2014  

They’re not exactly professionals from Brazil, but Traverse City’s Deep Blue Water Samba School is making waves here, creating a swell of interest in South American inspired beats.

CELEBRATING DRUMS

Founded by Marc Alderman in 2011 during International Drum Month, the DBWSS started their journey at the Good Work Collective in downtown TC, with the support of Porterhouse Productions’ Sam Porter, who gave them rehearsal space and instrument rental at a reduced rate.

Alderman, who has been studying and teaching drumming for the past 15 years, used to run a recreational drumming organization called Rhythmic Adventures.

Once that project ended, he wanted to find a new way to share drumming with his community.

“I thought of upping the ante from a casual, drop-in drum circle, and wanted to form a group that was accessible, but also worked on specific rhythms week after week,” he said.

SOUTH AMERICAN STYLE

Those specific rhythms are that of samba batucada, a parade style of drumming from Brazil.

It’s what you’d hear if you went to Rio de Janeiro during the spring Carnival parades, when hundreds of drummers accompany singers and guitarists in a fast-paced, repetitive whirl of sound.

After breaking his left hand in a bad car accident, Alderman decided he’d give the sound a whirl, too.

Although primarily trained on African styles of drumming and on the djembe (hand drum), he found that playing with sticks was easier after his accident.

“This brought me to seek out a style of music that had room for the improvisation and excitement that you find in African music, but on instruments that you find in a marching band and play with sticks,” he continued. “This is how I see samba batucada: the rhythmic sensibilities of West African drumming, mixed with the instrumentation of Eurocentric marching bands.”

RHYTHM PARADE

The instruments used to play samba batucada are similar to what Westerners would recognize, but have Portuguese names.

“For example, the snare drum in the samba band is called a caixa, and bass drums are called surdos,” Alderman said.

A range of smaller percussion instruments are added to the sound, to make for one bombastic, celebratory show.

“Our performances are engaging and entertaining, with high levels of volume,” Alderman said.

“This is parade music, so it is pretty loud.”

Anywhere from eight to 16 people perform at a DBWSS event, playing caixas, surdos, tamborims (a small, flat drum that looks like a tambourine without the jingles), agogo bells, repiniques (a two-headed Brazilian drum), and shakers.

The group sets down a basic groove, punctuating it with breaks, dynamic changes, and call and response sections to get the audience involved.

“We have them clap along, play a shaker, dance, or even jump on a drum,” Alderman said.

SAMBA SMILES

The DBWSS is big on participation, and welcomes new members. Alderman said the group is great for hand drummers interested in something different, drum set players who want to add a new skill, or even marching band drummers who “want to add a little swing” to their playing.

The group hosts samba drumming classes the first and third Monday of each month at the Grand Traverse Circuit on 14th St.

“No previous experience is necessary - you just need to arrive ready to learn,” he said.

With upcoming performances at this year’s Blissfest and Traverse City’s Friday Night Live, there will be plenty of chances to see the DBWSS live.

And as the only samba drumming group in Northern Michigan, the rewards are great for those who join, he said.

“I think the group offers an opportunity for cultural exploration and expression,” he said. “It is also a positive, drug and alcohol free opportunity that anyone can get involved in.”

Those interested in participating in the Deep Blue Water Samba School can contact Marc Alderman at (231) 276-2328, email at deepbluewatersamba@gmail.com, or visit the group’s Facebook page.

 
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