Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Music · They've Got the Beat
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They've Got the Beat

Kristi Kates - July 7th, 2014  

They’re not exactly professionals from Brazil, but Traverse City’s Deep Blue Water Samba School is making waves here, creating a swell of interest in South American inspired beats.

CELEBRATING DRUMS

Founded by Marc Alderman in 2011 during International Drum Month, the DBWSS started their journey at the Good Work Collective in downtown TC, with the support of Porterhouse Productions’ Sam Porter, who gave them rehearsal space and instrument rental at a reduced rate.

Alderman, who has been studying and teaching drumming for the past 15 years, used to run a recreational drumming organization called Rhythmic Adventures.

Once that project ended, he wanted to find a new way to share drumming with his community.

“I thought of upping the ante from a casual, drop-in drum circle, and wanted to form a group that was accessible, but also worked on specific rhythms week after week,” he said.

SOUTH AMERICAN STYLE

Those specific rhythms are that of samba batucada, a parade style of drumming from Brazil.

It’s what you’d hear if you went to Rio de Janeiro during the spring Carnival parades, when hundreds of drummers accompany singers and guitarists in a fast-paced, repetitive whirl of sound.

After breaking his left hand in a bad car accident, Alderman decided he’d give the sound a whirl, too.

Although primarily trained on African styles of drumming and on the djembe (hand drum), he found that playing with sticks was easier after his accident.

“This brought me to seek out a style of music that had room for the improvisation and excitement that you find in African music, but on instruments that you find in a marching band and play with sticks,” he continued. “This is how I see samba batucada: the rhythmic sensibilities of West African drumming, mixed with the instrumentation of Eurocentric marching bands.”

RHYTHM PARADE

The instruments used to play samba batucada are similar to what Westerners would recognize, but have Portuguese names.

“For example, the snare drum in the samba band is called a caixa, and bass drums are called surdos,” Alderman said.

A range of smaller percussion instruments are added to the sound, to make for one bombastic, celebratory show.

“Our performances are engaging and entertaining, with high levels of volume,” Alderman said.

“This is parade music, so it is pretty loud.”

Anywhere from eight to 16 people perform at a DBWSS event, playing caixas, surdos, tamborims (a small, flat drum that looks like a tambourine without the jingles), agogo bells, repiniques (a two-headed Brazilian drum), and shakers.

The group sets down a basic groove, punctuating it with breaks, dynamic changes, and call and response sections to get the audience involved.

“We have them clap along, play a shaker, dance, or even jump on a drum,” Alderman said.

SAMBA SMILES

The DBWSS is big on participation, and welcomes new members. Alderman said the group is great for hand drummers interested in something different, drum set players who want to add a new skill, or even marching band drummers who “want to add a little swing” to their playing.

The group hosts samba drumming classes the first and third Monday of each month at the Grand Traverse Circuit on 14th St.

“No previous experience is necessary - you just need to arrive ready to learn,” he said.

With upcoming performances at this year’s Blissfest and Traverse City’s Friday Night Live, there will be plenty of chances to see the DBWSS live.

And as the only samba drumming group in Northern Michigan, the rewards are great for those who join, he said.

“I think the group offers an opportunity for cultural exploration and expression,” he said. “It is also a positive, drug and alcohol free opportunity that anyone can get involved in.”

Those interested in participating in the Deep Blue Water Samba School can contact Marc Alderman at (231) 276-2328, email at deepbluewatersamba@gmail.com, or visit the group’s Facebook page.

 
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