Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Girl Gone Mild

Rita Rudner’s soft-spoken comedy still kills

Ross Boissoneau - July 7th, 2014  

When her dancer’s legs began to wear out, Rita Rudner decided her show biz odds were much better as a standup comedian.

“It was very practical,” said Rudner, who is appearing at Traverse City’s City Opera House on July 17. “There was less competition.”

The witty, off-kilter comedian made a wise choice. Rudner became one of the hottest comics around, performing at clubs around the country, and becoming a frequent guest of Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show.”

More recently, she’s been a regular attraction in Las Vegas, doing her act there almost exclusively for the past 12 years.

Rudner says she has always felt the pull of show business. After graduating from high school at 15, she left her Miami home for the bright lights of Broadway. She appeared in several shows, but she saw the career of a dancer as a short one.

“You don’t get better as a dancer when you get older,” she said.

That observation led her to the world of comedy, and she applied the same discipline she learned as a dancer to her new field. She analyzed humor and studied other comics, especially Woody Allen and Jack Benny, both famed for their engaging observations and razor-sharp timing.

“When I began to research comedy I loved it,” she said.

Rudner says nearly all of her material is written ahead of time.

“I always prepare – 99.5 percent is prepared,” she said. “You’re not going to go onstage not knowing what steps you’re going to do.”

Rudner is also a successful actress and author. She’s written four books, two memoirs and two novels. She’s also written screenplays and a play with her husband and manager, Martin Bregman.

One arena she hasn’t stepped into is reality game shows. She says she has turned down appearances on shows like “I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here.”

“I get asked to do strange things. ‘We’ll drop you in a jungle and you can play games for food,’” she said. “No thank you.”

Though her plate is full, Rudner still ranks standup as her favored pursuit.

“Comedy is first, writing is second, acting is third,” she said. Her biggest priority, however, is her family. “The best part of the Las Vegas residency is I can be a mom and do my act,” she said. “It’s just like [singer] Celine Dion, except she flies into her shows in a helicopter.”

Rudner says one of the most beguiling things about her show for an audience is its intimacy.

“It’s personal,” she said. “Even in Vegas, with all these spectacle shows, it’s intimate.”

Her sweet, soft style also offers the audience a chance to relax – at least, when they’re not belly laughing.

“It’s like having a bunch of people over to my house,” Rudner said.

She says standup also provides her the opportunity to control her own fate.

“In a movie or TV show, you have no control of the editing, or when it will be out,” she said. “When you tell a joke, you get immediate feedback.”

While she continues performing regularly in Las Vegas, Rudner also takes her comedy on tour, as in the show at the Opera House.

“When my husband gets tired of me he sends me on the road,” she said with her trademark sweetness.

Many performers say they enjoy appearing live, but the travel is tedious. Rudner disagrees, saying she enjoys every aspect of touring.

“No one asks me to do anything. I get to meet a great new audience. People are nice to me,” she said. “I love hotel rooms, room service, the people I meet. It’s like a little vacation.”

Tickets for Rudner’s show start at $33. For more, visit cityoperahouse.org or call the box office at (231) 941-8082.

 
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