Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Features · New Biking Book
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New Biking Book

For Road And Rail-to-Trail Cyclists

Mike Terrell - July 14th, 2014  

Did you know Michigan is second in the nation for rail-to-trail conversions in the nation, and that we here in northern Michigan host the largest single day mountain biking event in North America (The Ice Man)?

Much has been written about mountain biking opportunities in both books and news articles in recent years, but there hasn’t been much for road cyclists detailing places to ride and new opportunities.

That is until now.

Robert Downes’ new book, Biking Northern Michigan, details 30 well researched rides across the northern Lower Peninsula that accommodates a variety of bikes. Each ride recommends the type of bike best suited for the ride. Some of the rail-to-trail rides are best suited for hybrids, cruisers and mountain bikes. Eighteen of the rides are on back roads, often between villages or circling around lakes. The rest are rail-to-trail rides and one island, which is Beaver Island, mostly sandy, dirt roads, where you will need a hybrid or mountain bike. The route between Traverse City and Kalkaska follows the Ice Man and a spur of the North Country Trail. You will definitely need a mountain bike.

Downes, who has ridden all over the world and put thousands of miles on his bike in northern Michigan alone, offers not only great maps and descriptions of the rides, but also includes lists of essential gear and a long dialogue about safety issues. Most of it is commonsense garnered through years of riding, but worth noting.

Each ride is accompanied by a well detailed map, which in the case of the TART Trail even includes dangerous intersections to be aware of. Many of the maps include alter native routes to higher traffic routes. Both routes are included on the maps with detailed descriptions in the text.

Each ride includes a quick synopsis including the distance and whether one way or round trip; a recommendation of the types of bikes best suited for the trip; the essentials that detail certain things you need for that ride and potential problems to watch out for along the way; traffic, is it heavy, light or none at all; and difficulty, is it easy, semitough or hard, and challenges.

Ride descriptions include not only the route, but lots of interesting highlights of things you’ll see along the route; historical sites, special developments, places to find a great burger and beer, ice cream, great view points and scenic picnic locations.

Although the book is not geared towards mountain biking Downes does offer some big tire options listing nine mountain bike treks in northern Lower Michigan with just a brief description on each one and where it’s located. No maps.

For planning a trip or just looking for a new area to ride in our northern region of the state this book offers the rider who likes roads and rail-to-trails a good selection of choices packed with information.

The book is available through local book stores, Brick Wheels in Traverse City and signed copies online at planetbackpacker.net.

 
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