Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Catching Light With Pastels
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Catching Light With Pastels

Al Parker - July 21st, 2014  

Crayons and pastels may look similar to the uninitiated, but the latter are hardly child’s play. Technically an oil-based paint, pastels are soft sticks of highly pigmented color, tempting to pile on but best smudged with a soft touch.

Pastels are a medium Barb Reich has been diving into for the past 12 years, creating expressive landscapes and still lifes.

“I think Georgia O’Keeffe said it best when she said, ‘I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for,’” said the Leelanau County resident.

In the past, Reich has worked in oils, watercolors and charcoals. Her journey has been “a continuous learning experience,” she said.

“I continue to try to capture moments, subjects, and strong visual concepts, most often by painting the light,” she said.

On Sept. 25 and 26, Reich will teach a two-day workshop in pastel landscapes at Oliver Art Center in Frankfort.


I was born and raised in Michigan, and I began my adventure in fine art as an adult at the age of 30. Better late than never! I felt the need for a creative outlet and began to study painting and drawing.

I began in oil, watercolor, pastel, charcoal, and found I couldn’t stop. I had to try everything. I was fortunate to be able to study under some of the most wonderfully talented and supportive fine art instructors, several from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit. They instilled in me the intense desire to draw better, paint color with more emotion, and always hunt and study the changing light.

I immediately felt a strong connection to the extraordinary medium of soft pastel, and it hooked me the moment I put pigment to paper. About 12 years ago I began to specialize, using pastel almost exclusively. Working with pure pigments is exciting and a finished pastel painting is beautifully complex.

I enjoy that pastel can be used dry or wet, allowing for an endless variety of mark making and flowing washes. It is truly a spectacular medium.


I enjoy painting things that I hold dear: familiar places, community, nature, people, often simple things. My paintings depict a specific moment in time, and they are often as much a personal history as they are a visual recording, almost a nudge saying ‘Please look here, this is important to me.’ I am a plein air painter, studio painter, and I paint from life as often as possible. I believe my plein air studies have made me a better studio painter, and my early still life and figure work helped me to see and render form.


It is always satisfying when a painting captures the essence of the subject, emotion, and concept you are visually striving to achieve, but some paintings go beyond. Some are personal and passionate, and that is how I feel about several paintings I completed of my husband at work on our farm in Gladwin. To me, they feel significant and meaningful. Having said that, I am forever hopeful that my best work is yet to come.


With all my talk about soft pastel, I began as an oil painter, and to this day feel a very strong attachment to this wonderful medium. Also, after owning a farm for 18 years, I am very familiar with crops, gardens, chickens, and bees. And I worked in the insurance industry for 20 years – an occupation that isn’t exactly linked to creativity!


Although I don’t have a favorite artist – there are so many great ones, with so much to learn from – it should come as no surprise that Degas was truly inspirational when my love of pastel first took over my mind and touched my soul.

If I mentioned Sargent, Nicolai Fechin, Richard Schmid, and all the plein air masters who can evoke joy simply by looking at their work, my list would be overly long to say the least.


Study, learn, and practice. Search out the best instructors you can find, teachers and mentors, whose work you admire. Then practice and study some more.

When your desire is strong, you must back it up by figuring out ways to continue moving forward. Persistence is key. Also, a few good art buddies are worth their weight in gold.


At Treeline Gallery in Suttons Bay, Mullaly’s Gallery in Elk Rapids, Hanni Gallery in Harbor Springs, or online at barbarareichstudio.com. To learn more about Reich’s September workshop, visit oliverartcenterfrankfort.org or call (231) 352-4151.

She will be part of a four-artist exhibition at the Oliver Center Oct. 1-Nov. 7.

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