Happy Hour

A weekly snapshot of Happy Hours around the region…


FireFly
Everyday, open-7 p.m., $1.75 highballs, $2.50 house chardonnay, $2.00 drafts, $1.00 off everything else.
310 Cass St., Traverse City

Fred's
Sunday-Thursday, 3-6 p.m., $1 off all drinks.
422 North 5th St., Roscommon

Lulu's Bistro
Thursdays, 5-9 p.m., $3 wells, $2 off drafts, select $5 wines.
213 N. Bridge St., Bellaire

Boyne River Inn
Everyday, 3-6 p.m., 1/4 off drinks.
229 Water St., Boyne City
 
Rendezvous Lounge, Odawa Casino
Thursday & Friday, $2.25 domestic drafts, $3.25 well drinks, $3.25 house wine.
1760 Lears Rd., Petoskey

Choice Bits!

Round-the-region snapshots of the dining scene. 

RUTHIE'S CHICKEN & DAIRY TWIST: Roasted chicken and ice cream, malts and shakes.
201 N. Bridge Ln., Bellaire. 213­-533­-8538.

MONEY'S PLATTE RIVER INN:
Practically an Up North institution, the place to find out the latest fishing or snowmobile news from the locals and visitors who gather for their hearty breakfasts, steaks, burgers, soup & salad bar, & homemade desserts.
10921 Main St., Honor. 231­ 352­6585.

BC LANES FAMILY ENTERTAIMENT CENTER:
When you've worked up an appetite from all the bowling and karaoke that Boyne City Lanes has to offer, you'll find a selection of hearty fare to choose from, including homemade soups & desserts. Cocktails are served at the Lanes,with live entertainment and glow ­bowling nights.
1199 West Boyne Road, 231-­582­-6353.

CHINA ONE:
Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner. Full Chinese menu, as well as Hunan & Szechuan entrees.  Daily specials, special combination plates,  a lunch & dinner All You Can Eat Buffet. 
616 S. Mitchell St., Cadillac, 231­-876­-8888.

A&W:
Take a trip back to the '50s where chili dogs & frosted mugs of root beer are still served up by carhops at this All ­American institution. Elvis has been known to make an appearance during their annual summer “A&W Cruise Night” in August, as do cars from the 50’s and 60’s that we remember well.
At the bottom of the hill, 21 Lake St., Frankfort,  231-­352-­9021.

BIG BUCK BREWERY & STEAKHOUSE:
From Antler Ale to Wolverine Wheat, Big Buck specializes in microbrewed beers. Offering the usual beef and buffalo burgers, steaks, and ribs, plus more unusual fare, like their portabella sandwich with red onion marmalade and provolone cheese.
550 S. Wisconsin Avenue, Gaylord, 989­-732-­5781.

THE NEW YORK RESTAURANT:
A refined atmosphere, subdued lighting, and an appetizing selection of epicurean treats awaits the diner at this Harbor Springs corner landmark. Menu selections range from their smoked whitefish ravioli appetizer to their Atlantic salmon, baked polenta and eggplant, tomato basil fettuccine, or filet mignon ­ and their brunches include one of the best versions of Eggs Benedict around.
101 State Street, downtown across from Bar Harbor, 231­-526-­1904.

EMPIRE VILLAGE INN: 
Pool tables, a full bar, friendly service and a varied menu make the Village Inn popular with families and locals.  Dinners include Lamb Skewers, Blue Corn Enchiladas, Charbroiled Whitefish, Lasagna and Ribeye.  Also burgers, sandwiches, salads, appetizers and pizza.  Lunch and Dinner.
Just north of the blinking light 116601 Lacorre Ave. on M­22,  Empire. 231-326­-5101.

JESPERSON'S:
One of Petoskey's first restaurants, Jesperson's is famous for homemade pies and fresh turkey. Breakfast and lunch.
312 Howard, Petoskey, 231­-347­-3601.
 
CUPPA JOE:
Located in Building 50, grilled panini's, soups, wraps, baked goods, specialty coffees and teas.
1200 W. 11th St., Traverse City, 231-­947­-7740.

Home · Articles · News · Dining · Quay: Charlevoix’s New Dining...
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Quay: Charlevoix’s New Dining Destination

Ross Boissoneau - July 28th, 2014  

When he opened his new restaurant, Quay, Charlevoix native Eric Hodgson encountered a challenge on many levels.

Three, to be exact. That’s how many floors there are in his Bridge Street restaurant.

The second and third floors overlook the park across the street and Round Lake beyond. That’s great for guests, but not so much for the staff, who have to take food from the first-floor kitchen up a flight of steps or two.

“The building is extremely difficult. It’s a neat experience for diners but a challenge for staff,” said Hodgson. “That’s why we have a limited menu on the Terrace Bar.”

THE SCENE

Hodgson’s wife Dana is from Beaver Island, and the two own three places there: The Shamrock Bar and Grill, the Beachcomber Bar, and the Beaver Island Lodge.

When they discovered the former Whitney’s Oyster Bar location was available, they decided the time was right to venture back to the mainland.

“People told us Charlevoix needed a destination restaurant,” Hodgson said, noting that for special occasions people would often travel to places like Traverse City, Petoskey and Boyne City.

On the third floor, the open-air bar features a great view. The view extends to the second floor as well, where the menu reflects what Hodgson calls New American cuisine. Steaks and fish are featured as is pork, chicken and lamb; with sandwiches, soups, salads, and wraps available for lunch.

Quay beckons locals and visitors alike.

THE MENU

The soups and many of the small plates and salads are the same on both the lunch and dinner menus: Rustic tomato soup with roasted garlic croutons, whitefish tostada with cucumber salsa, and crab cakes with cilantro aioli are among the choices.

Other choices earlier in the day are tabbouleh made with red quinoa, arugula, and grape tomatoes; a Cobb salad with blue cheese vinaigrette; and duck confit flatbread.

Sandwiches include a crispy shrimp po’boy; Italian muffuletta with salami, mortadella and capicola; roasted pork, capanota melt with eggplant and peppers; and a certified Angus burger.

Quay really lights up in the evening, with what Hodgson hopes are selections appealing enough to preclude traveling out of town.

Steak lovers can try the ribeye with sweet potato and gorgonzola gratin and grilled asparagus. The grilled adobo pork tenderloin is served with a cornbread panzanella, smoky citrus barbecue sauce and grilled vegetables.

Pan seared halibut is accompanied by candy stripe beets and potato and mortadella croquette, while whitefish provencal boasts tomatoes, artichokes, caper berries and crispy rice cake.

The namesake Quay Burger features foie gras, arugula, blackberry relish, and caper scallion aioli.

THE BEST

Hodgson says the whitefish is one of the most popular dishes.

“Whitefish in Northern Michigan – everybody’s got a favorite,” he said. “Many people have said this is the best whitefish they’ve had. That’s extremely high praise.”

Hodgson says he is partial to another of Quay’s fish dishes.

“My favorite is the halibut. It’s wonderful,” he said. “And the lamb chops – I’m a lamb chop fanatic.”

For starters, you can’t beat the watermelon gazpacho. The cold soup is enhanced by feta cheese, vanilla bean oil and fresh mint. It’s refreshing and different.

THE REST OF THE STORY

Hodgson credits his culinary team, headed by Chef Meghan Wruk and sous chef Darwin Fishinghawk, for the dishes served at Quay. He says the menu is the creation of Wruk.

“She’s worked a lot of places in Northern Michigan,” he said. “She’s extremely talented.”

Hodgson credits scratch cooking as the basis for Quay’s well-rounded menu, which includes homemade flatbread crackers, as well as the aioli and sauces.

“We do everything from scratch,” he said. “Nothing comes out of a bottle or jar.”

Hodgson says after the summer rush he intends to change things up, both in terms of hours and the menu.

“In the shoulder seasons we’ll probably go with more comfort foods at lower prices,” he said. “That’s better for locals, but we’ll keep the standards high. Our goal is to serve the best food in Northern Michigan at a reasonable price.

The name is derived from a landing place or provisioning site for ships.

“It’s the name of a dock or structure which is used to provision a boat,” he said. “It plays off the wharf at the municipal dock across the street.”

Even if the provisions aren’t making it onto a ship anymore, Hodgson doesn’t mind.

“This location has been a tavern or restaurant for over 100 years,” he said. “Even if boats don’t provision here, the crews can.”

THE SKINNY

Prices start at $6 for soup or salads. Other small plates start at $9. Sandwiches begin at $9, and entrees at $23.

Quay is open seven days, lunch from 11am- 4pm; dinner 5pm-9pm.

The restaurant is located at 307 Bridge St. Call (231) 547-7450; online, visit quayrestaurantandterracebar.com or visit its Facebook page.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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