Letters 10-05-2015

Bravo Regarding the Sept. 28 Northern Express letter “Just The Facts” by Julie Racine, opinion column “E Pluribus Unum” by Thomas Kachadurian, and Spectator column “Fear Not” by Stephen Tuttle: Bravo. Bravo. Bravo....

Right On OMG. Julie Racine’s letter “Just the Facts” in the Sept. 28 issue said everything I was thinking. I totally agree. Amen sister...

Kachadurian’s Demeaning Sham Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion piece “E Pluribus Unum” is a very ill-informed perspective of American history. He attempts to portray our past as a homogenized national experience that has transcended any ethnic and regional differences with “the understanding” that our differences shouldn’t really matter...

Opinions Disguised As Facts Freedom of speech is a founding principle upon which our country prides itself, and because of this we all have a right to our opinion. It is when opinions are disguised as facts that we allow for ignorance to spread like wildfire...

Reject Your Own Stereotypes In his “E Pluribus Unum” column of 9/28, Mr. Kachadurian starts calmly enough with a simple definition and history of that famous motto from the Great “from many, one” seal of the U.S., but soon goes off the rhetorical rails. Alas, this heritage-sharing chat with neighbors soon turns into a dirty laundry list polemic, based on an us vs. them worldview...

Thanks For Just The Facts Thank you sooooo much to Julie in Marion for laying out the laundry list of right wing fabrications in her letter last week...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Painting With Yarn
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Painting With Yarn

Al Parker - July 28th, 2014  

An encounter with a yarn rug in Leland hooked artist Michelle Mueller on an entirely new – and old – kind of needlecraft.

Now, the punch needle rug-hooking enthusiast has her own studio and is teaching others how to make their own.

Located in Elk Rapids, The Wild Hare Rug Studio is a cozy shop on River St. There, Mueller creates colorful rugs, wall hangings, seat covers and other items.

Punch needle rug hooking is a meticulous technique that dates back to the late 1800s and is widely practiced on the East Coast.

“It’s very popular in Maine and New Hampshire and up into Canada,” she said. The technique uses no knots; instead, the needle forms a continuous loop stitch. Every time the needle is poked down, it pushes down a long end of yarn. When the needle is brought back up, it folds that end into a loop.

The tightness of all the loops packed together keeps it from unraveling. Work is done from the backside of the rug.

Mueller’s classes range from small group sessions to one-on-one instruction. New students work from patterns, but eventually create their own unique designs.

In 1991, Mueller moved from Detroit to Leland where she operated a quilt shop. She also worked for Ethan Allen Furniture as a design associate.

Mueller and her husband later relocated to Williamsburg, where she raises ducks and chickens and dyes her own wool for the store. “We opened in August of last year and it’s been great,” said Mueller. “We looked at every nook and cranny available [in the area] and love it here in Elk Rapids. It’s a wonderful town.”


I grew up in Detroit, near 7 Mile and Mack, and went to Bishop Gallagher High School. I didn’t go to college. I did secretarial work, mostly with design and architectural firms.

I have always enjoyed needlecraft. I tried needlepoint, crossstitch, embroidery, hand quilting and hand appliqué. Punch needle rug hooking is the one I love! Working with yarn has been the most enjoyable experience for me. I feel as though I am able to paint with yarn.


I saw a rug on display in a window at The Tin Soldier gift shop. The design was roosters, made by a company called McAdoo Rugs in Vermont. I went inside to take a closer look and immediately loved the yarn texture, the vivid color and the graphic quality of the design.

Time passed, but I held the image of that rug in my head. I eventually connected with Amy Oxford, inventor of the punch needle tool. I traveled to Vermont in April 2011 to take her class and become a certified teacher.


I really enjoy teaching people how to make a punch needle rug. I especially love it when I see their creative confidence grow and the satisfaction a student has when they have discovered they can make a rug.


My husband and I live on a six-acre farm where we raise chickens and ducks. It’s a late 1800s house and we’re busy restoring a barn. Also, one time, out of necessity, I purchased a very large quantity of wool rug yarn, 500 pounds, from a mill in Canada. Then I had to learn how to dye it. With no experience, I jumped in and was surprised how much I like it. It has been an added bonus to the creative process.


Fiber artist and rug maker Deanne Fitzpatrick from Canada. Her motto is ‘Create Beauty Every Day.’ That works for everyone.


Don’t give up. Try different things until the right thing clicks. One thing leads to another and before you know it, you will have discovered the creative side of yourself. Nurture it and let it grow.


At The Wild Hare Rug Studio in Elk Rapids or at wildharerugstudio.com.

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