Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · The Musical Side of TCFF
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The Musical Side of TCFF

Believe it or not, someone once had to beg musicians to perform at the Traverse City Film Festival.

Kristi Kates - July 28th, 2014  

When Traverse City Film Festival Entertainment Manager Mike Sullivan first started booking musical acts nine years ago, he had to call his musician friends and plead with them to play.

Now, with 300 spots to fill, Sullivan is overwhelmed by submissions each year. His challenge now is to pair genres of music with the wide range movies at the fest.

SUPPORTING A VISION

Working with his wife Joan, plus Kathy Wilson, Rick Siders, and a roster of interns and volunteers, the crew works year-round prepping the entertainment.

As the festival draws near, the group puts in up to 40 hours a week, carefully choosing the acts to fit the mood and style of the movies.

“The music’s function is to create a sonic atmosphere that supports the emotional tone of the movie,” Sullivan said.

Carl Henry, a Detroit-based bluesman, will open a movie about Detroit, while The Grand Traverse Show Choir will be matched up with a documentary about Mitt Romney.

The innovative Asylum Quartet has been paired with the dark, absurd comedy of Larry Charles.

“This is a wonderful challenge for musicians,” Sullivan said. “It isn’t so much about showcasing as supporting the filmmaker’s vision.”

In addition to the pre-screen performances, a slate of free concerts takes place at the music stage by the bay. Sullivan tries to theme these events, but sometimes fate intervenes.

“There are usually two themes: the one we plan, and the one that emerges,” he said with a laugh.

DIVERSE SUBMISSIONS

One of his initial ideas for this 10th anniversary year of the fest was to bring in Klezmer music (a style of Jewish celebration music), but the band he wanted couldn’t make it.

Meanwhile, other patterns were emerging.

“As submissions came in this year, we discovered several a capella groups and Detroit performers,” Sullivan said.

The abundance translated into a night devoted to a capella groups and an overarching theme devoted to the Motor City, he said.

“I am calling [it] ‘The Detroit Invasion,’ as it seems to represent a new spirit of hope and enthusiasm,” Sullivan said.

Returning acts, especially local ones like The Accidentals, are a big part of the TCFF’s music lineup.

Argentinian pop singer Milagros is returning, as well as some new groups, he said “We have the minimalistic music of Canadian performer Frank Paul, the neobluegrass of Fauxgrass, and an exciting collaboration of local legends Al Jankowski and David Chown,” said Sullivan.

Others on Sullivan’s “must-see” list include Claudia Schmidt, Miriam Pico, Blake Elliott, Ireland’s Full Set, R&B singer Laura Rains, hip-hop band Cold English, Irish band Fynbar, and Song of the Lakes.

But as more musicians hear about the TCFF, the more Sullivan’s challenges increase.

“We have been getting more and more interest from acts all over the world that want to perform at the TCFF,” he said. “While we do strive to provide diversity, we also remain committed to showcasing the remarkable music scene that’s alive and well in Northern Michigan.”

MUSICAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Coordinating 300 performances is no easy feat.

There are musical acts scheduled for 230 of the 235 movies that are scheduled to screen at this year’s event.

In addition, there will be free live performances every hour from noon-10pm in Clinch Park, free concerts every night at the Open Space, and even more performances at the Founders, Opening, and Filmmakers parties. Whew.

And it’s all made both more difficult and more rewarding by Sullivan’s insistence on a more “real” approach to getting the musicians in and out in a timely fashion.

“We want to make personal contact with each musician, and make sure they know how much we appreciate their contribution to the festival experience,” he said. “This becomes quite intense during the festival, when we have up to 10 events going on at the same time.”

But since all of the festival musicians are volunteering their time, these personal thank yous are of utmost importance to Sullivan, who has also developed a musician sponsorship program that will allow film fest patrons to help financially support the festival musicians.

So as a festival patron, take a moment to return the favor and thank Sullivan’s team for all of their work.

Don’t be surprised if their leader seems a bit distracted, because even as he’s making sure this year’s performances run smoothly, he’s already making plans for next year’s fest.

“I am thinking about and listening for festival acts all year long,” Sullivan said.

For a complete schedule of music at the Traverse City Film Festival, running July 29- Aug. 3, visit the fest’s official site at traversecityfilmfest.org/music. Don’t forget to pick up a copy of the 2014 TCFF Music Compilation Greatest Hits CD ($15) or Flashdrive Wristband ($20), both available at every venue during the event.

 
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