Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Homesteading Comes Alive in Port Oneida

Ross Boissoneau - August 4th, 2014  

Among the many fairs dotting the north this summer, one in particular stands out for what it doesn’t have.

No Gibby Fries. No Ferris wheel. And definitely no beer tent.

The Port Oneida Fair celebrates a kinder, gentler era. Held in Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore, the fair showcases oxen tilling fields and people making rugs, grinding corn, churning butter, and even playing music of yesteryear.

The 13th annual fair is scheduled for August 8 and 9, from 10am-4pm. The free event allows visitors to step back in time to the years between 1850 and 1945.

History enthusiast Dave Taghon of Empire takes part in the festivities, along with his wife Diane and others who are regulars at the Empire Area Museum.

“We take a variety of things from the museum,” said Taghon.

A large portion of the items relates to music, such as old Victrolas and wax cylinders.

They also take flatirons, corn-grinding equipment, and other objects that date back to earlier eras, particularly when farmsteaders had to be entirely self-sufficient.

SIX TIMES THE FUN

The Port Oneida Rural Historic District is a community of 18 farmsteads listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It’s located between Glen Arbor and Leland in southwestern Leelanau County.

The activities take place at six locations, with many offering snacks, and/or ice cream.

The Burfiend Barn focuses on maritime activities and live music, hands-on children’s activities, and square dancing.

At the Dechow Farm, visitors can see oxen mowing in the fields, horses and other livestock, beekeeping, and broom- and rope-making.

At the Kelderhouse Farm, there will be a re-enactment of Civil War camp life. Attendees can also visit with members of the Kelderhouse family.

At the Olsen Farm, activities include a focus on historic food preservation and cooking demonstrations, dulcimer music, old-time photography, quilting, soap-making, children’s games, and oral history recording.

School is in session most of the day at the Port Oneida Schoolhouse. And at Thoreson Farm, the focus is on traditional crafts: spinning, blacksmithing, local artists, and musicians.

The farms of the Port Oneida area are typical of the turn of the century farms throughout the Midwest. It is rare, however, to find such a large collection of older farms free from modern development.

HISTORY LESSON

Carsten Burfiend, a native of Hanover, Germany, was its first European resident, purchasing 275 acres in 1852. By the 1860 census, the population of the area was 87 people, most of them immigrants from Germany and Prussia.

Albany businessman Thomas Kelderhouse, who owned numerous Lake Michigan cargo ships, was responsible for much of the logging in the area. In 1862 he built a dock on land provided by Burfiend. The growing community was named after the SS Oneida, one of the first steamships to stop at the dock.

Kelderhouse died in 1884, and by the 1890s most of the land had been logged off. By 1908, all the buildings at the original Port Oneida town site except the Kelderhouse residence had been abandoned. The Kelderhouse family lived in this house until 1934.

Thus the area is quiet today, except for the second weekend in August, when it comes alive again.

FAMILY FRIENDLY FUN

More than 100 artists and craftspeople will demonstrate specialties during the fair. Activities for children can be found at each site. Many of the buildings at these sites are open to walk through and explore.

For the exhibitors, the opportunity to take visitors back in time is priceless, though there is an opportunity cost.

“Being a participant, we don’t get to see much of the fair,” said Tom Cyr.

Cyr has been part of the fair since its inception, taking people on wagon rides and plowing fields with his black Percheron horses. The opportunities for children – and adults – to experience things up close extend in many directions. The oxen that are used to plow the fields, part of Tillers International from the Kalamazoo area, are tame enough for kids to touch.

With all the exhibitors and activities taking place simultaneously, along with the additional buildings being open for the curious, even a full day may not be enough to take it all in.

“I would love to take two days and go through all the farms,” said Cyr. To find out more about the area and fair, with a complete schedule, visit friendsofsleepingbear.org/ projects/port-oneida-fair.

 
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